Cartaux - engraver

Started by africancoins, March 21, 2010, 01:43:10 AM

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redwine

Ding Dong!  ;D

Always willing to trade.  See my profile for areas of interest.

redwine

Here are another 13 for you, my lucky number!  8)
I finally got my PHD  ;)
ZZ are top! ;D
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malj1

A nice selection of these consommer pieces.

I have noticed that many of these pieces are duplicated for the British market, the obverse staying the same but with the reverse legend replaced with "To Be Spent in the House" and bearing the denomination 1d or 2d in the centre. Many still bear the French mintmarks of course.

I have a selection of these shown here. This shows that a great number of the French slot machines were installed in British public houses.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

redwine

You've got some crackers there Mal 8)
I particularly like the elephant  ;D  And the signal lamp, bridge, boar.....................  ;D
It would be nice to find an exact copy with different reverse................................
Always willing to trade.  See my profile for areas of interest.

redwine

Here's a link to a great French site with loads of 'a consommer'
http://multicollec.net/1-mo-h/1h49
I'll have a scan some time but I haven't got much computer time today  :'(
Always willing to trade.  See my profile for areas of interest.

malj1

Quote from: redwine on December 04, 2013, 06:50:39 AM
I particularly like the elephant  ;D  And the signal lamp, bridge, boar.....................  ;D
It would be nice to find an exact copy with different reverse................................

This pair are almost exact...
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

redwine

Quote from: malj1 on December 04, 2013, 10:50:30 AM
This pair are almost exact...

Very close!
Interesting that DEPOSE is skew whiff on the British piece  8)
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malj1

That DEPOSE seems to be upside-down or back-to-front, or both, on many pieces - I can't imagine how they do this!  ???

I would have expected one stock tool to make the complete word each time.  ::)
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Figleaf

I wonder if the upside-down DÉPOSÉ might mean something like: to be exported, not to be sold in the Paris shop. Shop staff could be told: if you can read it, fine. If it's upside down, don't sell it. That way, they didn't need to turn the token around. Mnemonic support: a ship flying its flag upside down is in trouble - common knowledge at the time.

Suppose you sell a token to Britain, where its value will be 3 d. Suppose that would be 20 centimes and you set the price in France at 22 centimes, just to be sure. Now the franc rises in value and 3 d equals 25 centimes. Enterprising spirits would buy up the stock in Paris and use it to defraud the British client. Not good business, so either you keep an eye on exchange rates all the time and remember which of your foreign clients uses your tokens for what value or you simply don't sell exported tokens in the shop.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

redwine

Always willing to trade.  See my profile for areas of interest.

malj1

Quote from: redwine on December 04, 2013, 06:50:39 AM
You've got some crackers there Mal 8)
I particularly like the elephant ;D  And the signal lamp, bridge, boar.....................  ;D
It would be nice to find an exact copy with different reverse................................

The elephant again...



And now the French consommer variety...  a real cracker!  :o

Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

redwine

Always willing to trade.  See my profile for areas of interest.

Figleaf

Quote from: malj1 on December 23, 2013, 09:34:26 PM
...but why the cut-out on the edge?

Maybe to keep it from being used as an official coin or more likely to ensure that official coins could not be used to operate the "juke box".

From wikipedia: Coin-operated music boxes and player pianos were the first forms of automated coin-operated musical devices. These instruments used paper rolls, metal disks, or metal cylinders to play a musical selection on the instrument, or instruments, enclosed within the device. In the 1890s these devices were joined by machines which used actual recordings instead of physical instruments. In 1890, Louis Glass and William S. Arnold invented the nickel-in-the-slot phonograph, the first of which was an Edison Class M Electric Phonograph retrofitted with a device patented under the name of Coin Actuated Attachment for Phonograph. The music was heard via one of four listening tubes.

Early designs, upon receiving a coin, unlocked the mechanism, allowing the listener to turn a crank which simultaneously wound the spring motor and placed the reproducer's stylus in the starting groove. Frequently exhibitors would equip many of these machines with listening tubes (acoustic headphones) and array them in "phonograph parlors" allowing the patron to select between multiple records, each played on its own machine. Some machines even contained carousels and other mechanisms for playing multiple records. Most machines were capable of holding only one musical selection, the automation coming from the ability to play that one selection at will.


Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

redwine

More modern piece

O: LE FUSIL ELECTRIQUE A CIBLE / C.P
R: BREVET POUR LA FRANCE / CARTAUX PARIS / C.P
25mm
4.91g
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redwine

2.81g
19mm
Always willing to trade.  See my profile for areas of interest.