Author Topic: Quiz Question 11  (Read 631 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline chrisild

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8 414
  • NW · DE · EU
Quiz Question 11
« on: February 13, 2010, 06:25:33 PM »
This quiz is not actually about one specific coin, but about an entire collection.

Whose coin collection was primarily based on what the hangman gave him?

I wrote about that elsewhere, so dare not peek, hehe. And who knows, there may be more than one correct answer. Will post hints later in case the question is too obscure ...

Christian

Offline chrisild

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8 414
  • NW · DE · EU
Re: Quiz Question 11
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2010, 12:37:37 PM »
Hint: Europe, early 19th century. The hangman (well, an executioner actually, but hangman sounds more dramatic :) ) died about nine years after the deal.

Christian

Offline RHM22

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 139
  • E NVMMI AGNITIO
Re: Quiz Question 11
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2010, 08:21:18 PM »
Just so everyone knows, I guesses Paul Revere (erroneously :)) and Thomas Paine, but neither was the answer. :D

Offline chrisild

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8 414
  • NW · DE · EU
Re: Quiz Question 11
« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2010, 09:58:27 PM »
Yep, neither Revere nor Paine. In fact the man was a very prominent figure in Europe at that time. Oh, and his first language was basically the same as mine ...

Christian

Offline RHM22

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 139
  • E NVMMI AGNITIO
Re: Quiz Question 11
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2010, 10:01:00 PM »
Martin Luther? ;D

Offline chrisild

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8 414
  • NW · DE · EU
Re: Quiz Question 11
« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2010, 10:03:41 PM »
Time wise, the man I am asking about is closer to Martin Luther King. 8) ("Early 19th century".) And have I mentioned that this executioner was the last one to do that job in "his" city?

Christian

Offline chrisild

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8 414
  • NW · DE · EU
Re: Quiz Question 11
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2010, 12:46:56 AM »
Inspired by the overwhelming participation ;D I will post a hopefully more helpful hint: The collector I would like you to find was a Central European statesman, quite influential particularly in and around 1815, and saying he was Austrian would definitely not be wrong. Also, a German sparkling wine brand was named after him ...

Christian

Offline chrisild

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8 414
  • NW · DE · EU
Re: Quiz Question 11
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2010, 02:16:40 PM »
It sure is not easy to come up with a good quiz. :) Did not want to ask a question that can easily be answered by using a search engine for a few seconds. But I probably picked the other extreme - something that is so obscure that nobody knows who I am "talking" about ...

OK, here we have Joe Statesman, who also collects coins - there we have Bob Hangman. Bob gives Joe something for his collection; now what could that be? Well, coins. The name of the executioner is not really well known, but the statesman is, I think. He is even depicted on a euro collector coin. Oh, I should shut up now, hehe.

Christian

translateltd

  • Guest
Re: Quiz Question 11
« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2010, 06:53:53 PM »
Metternich?


Offline chrisild

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8 414
  • NW · DE · EU
Re: Quiz Question 11
« Reply #9 on: February 25, 2010, 07:23:25 PM »
Bingo! Hip-hip-hooray! (Whew, it's over. ;) )

Actually it's him. Interestingly, today I first got a PM with the correct answer, but the sender wrote that his was not an official reply. So, it's your turn - come up with a new question, please. Will post a little about the background of my question later today ...

Christian

Offline RHM22

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 139
  • E NVMMI AGNITIO
Re: Quiz Question 11
« Reply #10 on: February 25, 2010, 07:45:26 PM »
Martin - good luck. You'll need it! ;D There are two things that every numismatist can seek but cannot find - a complete collection and the perfect trivia question!

translateltd

  • Guest
Re: Quiz Question 11
« Reply #11 on: February 25, 2010, 07:58:29 PM »
OK, give me a little while to think about Question 12 ...

Offline chrisild

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8 414
  • NW · DE · EU
Re: Quiz Question 11
« Reply #12 on: February 25, 2010, 09:12:37 PM »
Yes, Klemens von Metternich was not only a statesman who had a lot of influence on Central European politics - he was also a coin collector.

In September 1827 Metternich made a deal with Karl Huss*, the last executioner in the city of Eger/Cheb: Huss would move to Königswart/Kynžvart* castle, and Metternich would grant him the right to use it as his residence until the end of his life, plus free heating and a pension. Huss had to take his coin collection to the castle, and work there as a curator. After his death, the coin collection would be Metternich's.

Now why would an executioner have such an interesting coin collection? Huss's father was an executioner too, in the city of Brüx/Most, and that job did not exactly have a good reputation. Yes, somebody "had to do it", but an executioner's office was not reputable. Karl Huss had to leave school early, and then went to Eger where is uncle was, you guessed it, an executioner. He first assisted his uncle, then got the job himself.

Apparently executions were, as from 1788, not done that way (sword, gallows) any more, and Huss was no longer needed. However, he had learned quite a bit about medicine, and then treated some humans and animals - a kind of self-made vet/doctor. He married the daughter of a baker, and they both lived in the executioner's house. His collection of coins, weapons, tools, gems, etc. grew, and he also did a lot of research about local and regional history. Goethe visited him several times and admired his collection.

Metternich heard about, and got interested in, what Huss had collected, and finally made that deal I mentioned. In October 1827 Huss moved to Königswart, and by May 1828 his entire collection was in the castle too. In terms of coins, he had more than 7,000 pieces with a total value of 7,500 gulden. Must have been quite a lot ...

Half a year later, however, a burglar stole many of the coins. The bag that he carried them away in must have weighed about 75 kg (165 lb). Initially Karl Huss was among the suspects too, and even Metternich did not quite trust him. But Huss, who had invested a lot of time and money in the collection while it was still his, apparently convinced Metternich: He (Huss) lived is "his" castle, with all of "his" coins, why would he steal part of the collection? Huss even showed visitors the castle and, in front of the empty coin showcases, would explain which piece had been where.

Roughly another six months later the guy who had stolen the coins was caught in Prague; he had most of the pieces in the inn/hotel room where he lived. And except for a few pieces that got lost, the Huss-Metternich collection can still be visited at Kynžvart castle, on the Western "edge" of the Czech Republic.

The Austrian euro coin that I mentioned is attached here. It does not commemorate the anniversary of Metternich's birth or death but is the Biedermeier coin from the Austrian History series.

* These two links point at German language sources.

Christian

Offline RHM22

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 139
  • E NVMMI AGNITIO
Re: Quiz Question 11
« Reply #13 on: February 25, 2010, 09:19:58 PM »
That's a great story! You should add it to the English language Wikipedia page on Metternich or Huss.