Author Topic: Numismatic quiz from India  (Read 1182 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30 900
Numismatic quiz from India
« on: July 25, 2007, 02:50:32 PM »
http://inhome.rediff.com/money/2007/jul/23quiz.htm

I think two of the answers are wrong...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Rangnath

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2 714
Re: Numismatic quiz from India
« Reply #1 on: July 27, 2007, 06:21:36 PM »
Peter, do you mean "wrong" as in presenting a false choice?

Surely there was a Hyderabad mint that preseded the one of 1903.  No?  My next guess would be that you know of paper money that preseded the ones the Chinese issued. 
richie

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30 900
Re: Numismatic quiz from India
« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2007, 07:20:00 PM »
Of course, coins were struck in India before the British introduced mechanized minting in Calcutta, Hyderabad and Bombay. Under the moguls alone, there were over 100 mints for the empire alone.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Rangnath

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2 714
Re: Numismatic quiz from India
« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2007, 07:33:15 PM »
And the second error in the quiz?  Perhaps you'd like to hold off on that until someone else takes the bait.
richie

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30 900
Re: Numismatic quiz from India
« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2007, 10:37:15 PM »
No, they were right on the second one. I seemed to remember that the question said "banknotes", but they accurately said "paper money", so I got it wrong and China wins. I do think it's debatable that they mention the Leiden obsidional pieces as paper money. The good citizens of Leiden were completely unfamiliar with banknotes and what they had in mind to produce was a coin, not a note. All the more so because the pieces are small and round. It just so happened that the most supefluous thing in the besieged city was catholic bibles, so they used them to make their emergency money.

Also, I learned about the term FIDO for the first time through the quiz.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Rangnath

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2 714
Re: Numismatic quiz from India
« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2007, 01:12:45 AM »
They used pages from the Bible? 
When was that Peter?
richie

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30 900
Re: Numismatic quiz from India
« Reply #6 on: July 28, 2007, 02:19:54 AM »
It happened during the 1574 second siege of Leiden, during the Dutch war of independence. The town was at wit's end and would have surrendered but for the brutality of the Spanish-led Habsburg army, which routinely executed practically all of the military plus a part of the civilian population of a town that surrendered. Leiden was finally relieved because the rebels succeeded in breaking the dikes, flooding the surrounding land. As a reward (but mainly because first choice Dordrecht was occupied by Habsburg troops), Leiden received the country's first university.

If you look at Leiden with Google earth or Google maps, you can clearly see where the city walls once stood, because the surrounding star-shaped moats still exist. The (now built-up) area called Lammeschans (to the Southeast on the road to the A12 motorway and on to Stompwijk en Zoetermeer) is where the Spanish headquarters were.

While the rebels were largely protestants, the Habsburg army was catholic and religion was one of the main issues of the revolt. What lead to using bibles was the consacration of the town's main churches for the protestant religion. The result was that the town suddenly had a large surplus of catholic bibles on its hands.

Leiden went on to become the first industrialized area in the world, the birthplace of Rembrandt and the meeting point for the pilgrim fathers (house is marked with a brass plaque). There were so many windmills in and around the city that people complained. Industry workers (mainly spinners, weavers and textile traders) were a rowdy, hard-drinking lot living off starvation wages and making impossibly long hours, but there was work for all comers and some got wealthy. Among my ancestors were two brothers from the lands of the bishop of Liege, who went to Leiden, got married to a local girl in a protestant church and joined the proletariat. One of the latest additions to the family tree, my daughter, studied in Leiden. One of the auditoriums she went to was once the main hall of the 5 centuries old prison. Doors can still be opened on one side only and windows are heavily barred...

At the date of the relief, 3rd October, Leiden throws a great party for itself. In summer, amateur actors recreate Rembrandt's "night watch" in 3 dimensions. All great fun.

Peter
« Last Edit: July 28, 2007, 02:21:51 AM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Rangnath

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2 714
Re: Numismatic quiz from India
« Reply #7 on: July 28, 2007, 02:36:42 AM »
I live in Irvington. Ancient histroy means following Captain Irving's exploits from the 1870's. 
So, sure, I am a bit envious of your connections with history. 

When were the first coins minted as an expression of independence from Spain?
richie

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30 900
Re: Numismatic quiz from India
« Reply #8 on: July 28, 2007, 02:58:21 AM »
Not a fair comparison, Richie until you start counting in remnants of non-western civilizations. Indian graves and arrow heads come to mind. Just to give you another reason to come to Leiden, though, the (public) university plant collection includes a few trees that pre-date the American revolution.

As for the earliest revolutionary coins, in 1572 some towns issued obsidional money (Middelburg, Haarlem). If you mean official coins you get a much later date. This is because until 1581 the rebels maintained the fiction that Philip II was a good king who was badly advised. In fact, the Dutch national anthem has the prince of Orange saying that he's always honoured the king of Spain. Only in 1581 was the king of Spain explicitly deposed. The first official coins were therefore minted in 1581, e.g. in Zeeland and Ghent.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline muntenman

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 156
  • SPERAMUS MELIORA RESURGET CINERIBUS
Re: Numismatic quiz from India
« Reply #9 on: July 29, 2007, 12:28:53 PM »
FIDO? FIDO DIDO of the 7-up branch  ;D
GLOBAL MODERATOR under the name of GRIVNAGOZER at www.munthunter.nl

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30 900
Re: Numismatic quiz from India
« Reply #10 on: July 29, 2007, 02:02:28 PM »
It's good to be in the living room.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline JeanPar

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 112
Re: Numismatic quiz from India
« Reply #11 on: July 29, 2007, 02:17:42 PM »
bloody  ;D :o ;D