Trade cards showing 19th century banknotes

Started by Pellinore, August 20, 2023, 12:46:59 AM

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Pellinore

These 8 cards came to me (years ago) from the United States. They are trade cards of the type that was very popular in the 1880-1900 period. According to a tiny line of text, they were part of a series of 24, but it's not clear to me what they were advertising.

However, we see banknotes. Probably the children of 1890 very much liked to collect banknotes, even if they were not Real, and they learned in the process how to read those beautiful and valuable objects without needing to possess them.

-- Paul


Bank note trade cards 1.jpg

Bank note trade cards 2.jpg

Bank note trade cards 3.jpg

Bank note trade cards 4.jpg

Manzikert

I don't think they were advertising anything in particular (though of course different companies could overprint the message side with advertisements) I think they are just a series of different national cards with a banknote and a typical inhabitant of the relevant country shown.

There is an extensive series of cards which show the full range of the coins of different countries https://duckduckgo.com/?q=coin+postcards&t=newext&atb=v363-1&iax=images&ia=images and I suspect these fill a similar (educational?) purpose.

Very attractive cards though: do they have a postcard back?

Alan

brandm24

I think they were just selling the cards themselves. Perhaps a tutorial on world paper money. Is there anything on the reverse?

Beautifully done cards for sure.

Bruce
Always Faithful

Figleaf

I am inclined to think the series is Walloon-Belgian. The cards are francophone - the small lettering says "No. x de la série de 24 billets". Within what you have posted, Belgium is by far the smallest country (Austria was a lot bigger in those days). Most important, the only "typical" inhabitant of the country in question that is realistic is the Belgian milk maid.

Peter

Milk maid.jpg
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

brandm24

Love the "engine" on the cart, Mr. Figleaf. :)

Bruce
Always Faithful

Pellinore

Thanks for all your answers. The cards may well be from France or Belgium. In fact I'm not quite sure where I bought them.
But I should have mentioned the dimensions, they are all 60 x 80 mm and the cards' backsides are blank.

-- Paul

JMP

No, not Belgian. These cards are French. In the corners one can read "BOGNARD PARIS" and on the www one can find under this title other cards and images of this editor. Like the one underneath:

CHROME CARD PARIS BOGNARD ERA 1880 90 -

Manzikert

The blank reverses would be ideal for overprinting as advertising/trade cards, so that is probably their reason for being issued. Collecting those cards was quite popular in the 19th century, especially in America where I know that a great number of series of cards were produced.

Alan