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Phillumeny

Started by krishna, February 26, 2023, 01:22:10 PM

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krishna

An article was published in todays Times of India, Ahmedabad Edition, about this senior collector of matchboxes, or a Phillumenist

Figleaf

I can't remember when I saw a matchbox last, but it must have been decades ago. I remember using matches for cases when a screw hd been turned too tight in wood, working itself out and leaving a hole too wide for itself. The solution was to cut a match to the right length, stick it in the hole with some glue and put the screw back the next day, this time taking care not to turn it too tight.

I guess it's the same thing with tokens. They used to be everywhere and now it's all credit card and pay-by-phone. Us collectors are preservers of the past. Only yesterday, I was told that plastic tokens were generally overlooked in the UK, but now that the first are over 100 years old, collectors are starting to take note of them. A good omen for WoT.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

krishna

Seems to be a very cumbersome ritual, just to light a match!!
Even today there may be more than 500 matchbox brands, small and large in india

Main consumers are the rural populace, who consume a local cigarette type smoking tobacco "beedi", which is one tenth in tobacco content and rolled in leaves (more moisture) instead of paper

And a pack consists of more than 50 beedis, which makes lighting it with matches more convenient

However it is carcinogenic and very bad for the respiratory system

FosseWay

Quote from: Figleaf on February 27, 2023, 07:41:01 PMI can't remember when I saw a matchbox last, but it must have been decades ago. 
I use matches every time I want to light fire. Granted, that isn't often, but it's a few times a year - to burn dry garden waste in a drum, perhaps light a candle on the dinner table, and mostly to set the barbecue going if the automatic sparker won't. If I were a smoker, I'd probably have a lighter, but since I'm not, matches are the most obvious way of generating fire.

Tirant

My grandfather had a small matchbox collection, which belongs to me since he passed away. Some years ago, a flood in my basement almost ruins it, luckily it didn't and got only some rust in the staples. Now i keep them in an hermetic box to prevent that again.

It's just another kind of collecting, which can be as fun as coins or tokens. In the XX century they were very popular (as most of you will surely remember), many of them had nice dessigns and it was easy to collect them, as they were given as souvenir in many places; currently they aren't and they're not easy to find.

krishna

we used to collect matchbox covers as children and play with them like playing cards, the value and attachment i had with such discarded items is seldom felt by me nowadays, even if the item is new and costly (barring coins ofcourse)

the world takes away all the innocence and spoils ones perspective regarding the joy which very simplest of things have got to offer

Figleaf

Quote from: FosseWay on February 28, 2023, 06:48:41 AMI use matches every time I want to light fire. Granted, that isn't often, but it's a few times a year - to burn dry garden waste in a drum, perhaps light a candle on the dinner table, and mostly to set the barbecue going if the automatic sparker won't. If I were a smoker, I'd probably have a lighter, but since I'm not, matches are the most obvious way of generating fire.

There are devices running on gas capsules that will do all that AND keep your hands at a much safer distance.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.