Shilling of Elizabeth I

Started by AZislands, January 18, 2010, 09:55:24 PM

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AZislands


Hi,
What do you think of this coin?




AZislands

Figleaf

This is a coin type I see most often when recovered by a metal detector. Most of these look awful, so your is doubly impressive: wonderful grade and a grade I didn't expect.

I have studied the wear on this coin and I still can't explain it. Look at the smudge on the portrait side. It seems to coincide with the wear on the other side (you need to mirror the right picture horizontally and turn it 90° counterclockwise to see what's on the same spot.) Then, there are the three pin holes. They look a bit like staple holes, except that staples had not been invented yet. Nails were much bigger. I think this coin was not just used as money, but I can't figure out for what purpose.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

UK Decimal +

I think that there's something else strange.   The top of the crown appears to have been squashed backwards - not like any other Elizabeth I coin that I've seen (pictured) before, although I'm probably wrong and it might be an optical illusion.

Watching with interest.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

andyg

Quote from: UK Decimal + on January 19, 2010, 12:27:36 AM
I think that there's something else strange.   The top of the crown appears to have been squashed backwards - not like any other Elizabeth I coin that I've seen (pictured) before, although I'm probably wrong and it might be an optical illusion.

Watching with interest.

Bill.

I agree - it doesn't immediately look wrong though - especially as the portraits of Elizabeth I changed over time slightly.  Unless I've missed something obvious it should be a shilling, as the legend starts with ELIZAB.

AZislands

Quote from: Figleaf on January 19, 2010, 12:13:13 AM
... Look at the smudge on the portrait side. ...
... Then, there are the three pin holes. ...

It was a recent acquisition. I do not understand anything of English coin, but, besides belonging to a very interesting period in Britain, I also think it is a beautiful coin.
Actually the area of the crown was violently crushed, which is a pity, as for the motive behind the 3 holes, I also can not understand.

Manuel