One-off non-commemorative circulation coins

Started by <k>, October 02, 2022, 08:02:05 PM

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<k>

This topic is for designs or denominations that were minted for one year only.

The coins in this topic should NOT be:

1] Circulating commemorative or special coins, e.g. FAO-themed coins.

2] Non-circulating coins.

3] Coins with an altered legend on a pre-existing similar design.

    See: Altered legend with same or similar design.

4] An existing design minted in a different metal.

5] Whole sets that appeared in one year only, e.g. Sierra Leone 1996.
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<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#3
Lebanon 5 piastres  1952.jpg

Lebanon, 5 piastres, 1952.


See: Lebanon: trees, galleys and lions.
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<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Cahow bird.




Onion.


Bermuda issued these standard circulation $1 and $5 coins in 1983 only.

They did not form a whole set, so they fit in this topic.
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<k>

#6


Malawi, 50 tambala, 2004.


The only version of the brass-plated 50 tambala with the coat of arms on the obverse and zebras on the reverse.

Previously the presidential portrait appeared on the obverse and the coat of arms on the reverse.


.

Malawi, 1 kwacha, 2004.


The only version of the brass-plated 1 kwacha with the coat of arms on the obverse.

Previously the presidential portrait appeared on the obverse.
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<k>



Fishermen at work.




A tea plantation worker.


Malawi, 5 and 10 kwacha, 2006.
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<k>



Federal Republic of Germany, 2 mark, 1951.


The reverse featured an attractive design of leaves, grapes, and grain sprigs.

This reminded us that Germany produces its own wine.
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chrisild

Yes, there are vineyards in this country ;) but "its own" sounds strange to me. German wine (grown in certain regions only, of course) is exported too, and wine from elsewhere gets imported. Problem with this coin was that it was too close to the 1 DM piece. The designs were similar, and the size difference was a problem too. So in 1957/58 that 2 DM coin was replaced by a somewhat larger one with a quite different look.

Another "one-off" piece is the Weimar Republic 4 Rpf coin. See here. Theoretically we could also add the 1923 Notgeld coins (200 and 500 Mark), and there will be others ...

<k>



Belgium, 2 francs, 1944.

Issued by the Allies, towards the end of the Second World War.
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<k>



France, 2 francs, 1944.

Issued by the Allies, towards the end of the Second World War.
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<k>






Bolivia, 10 and 50 centavos, 1937.  Art deco on Latin American circulation coins.

After that one year, the designs became very boring again.
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<k>

Germany 50 Reichspfennig 1935.jpg

Germany, 50 Reichspfennig, 1935.

Aluminium.  One year only, like all the other coins in this topic.

The prior versions were rather different. The later versions included a swastika.
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<k>

#14
Cambodia 5 sen 1979.jpg

Cambodia, 5 sen, 1979.


Cambodia: the coin types of the first riel were produced in two phases, in 1953 and 1959. These coins formed a cohesive and recognisable design series.

No new coin type was issued until 1979. This was the 50 sen coin (seen above), which was the first coin and the lowest denomination of the second riel (100 sen was equal to 1 riel). The next and final denominations / coin types of the second riel were not issued until 1994 and 1995. These last were all denominated in riels, not sen, presumably because of high inflation in the intervening period.

The designs of 1994 and 1995 all look similar in style and clearly belong to the same design series. There are even some similarities between those designs and some of the 1953 / 1959 designs. However, the obverse and reverse designs of the 50 sen coin of 1979 stand out as being entirely different from those of the 1950s and 1990s. The 50 sen coin therefore definitely belongs in this topic.



Cambodia-second riel.jpg

Cambodia: coins of the second riel - 1994 / 1995.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.