Lesser known symbolism on coins

Started by <k>, October 02, 2022, 04:26:25 PM

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<k>



Barbados, 1 cent.


Many of you will already know about the broken trident on the 1 cent coin.

The trident belonged to Britannia, and the broken trident represents the country's break with Britain.

It used to be a British colony.


However, did you also notice the garland that curls around the trident?

I suspect that most of you did not.

It forms a letter "B" for "Barbados".
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Obverse of Tokelau's first collector coin.


Tokelau's first collector piece was a 1 tala coin, issued in 1978.

The obverse shows the Queen Elizabeth II, who was Tokelau's head of state.


The beads around the rim are arranged in groups of three, to represent Tokelau's three atolls.


See also: Beads and dentillations on coins.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>


Tuvalu's 9-sided dollar featured a turtle.

The nine sides of the dollar represent each of the nine islands and atolls composing the Tuvalu chain.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>




Since the 1920s, South Africa has always shown two sparrows on its lowest denomination.

Partly, this is because it has included birds and other animals on all it design series.

But there is another reason.


The Afrikaners were mostly a devoutly Christian people.

The two sparrows were chosen as the design for the reverse of the quarter penny.

From the Bible:

Matthew 10: 29-31. "Are not two sparrows sold for a penny?

Yet not one of them will fall to the ground apart from the will of your Father.

And even the very hairs of your head are all numbered.

So be not afraid; you are worth more than many sparrows.
"

See also:

1] Coinage of the Union of South Africa.

2] South Africa: design continuity.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

chrisild

Cool, interesting info! The "B" I actually knew about (still good to have it here though), but the details about the others were new for me. :)

<k>

#5


Coat of arms of South Africa.

From Wikipedia:

The shield was a combination of symbols representing the four provinces (formerly colonies) that made up the Union.

The first quarter is the figure of Hope, representing the Colony of the Cape of Good Hope.

The two wildebeests of the second quarter represent the Colony of Natal.

The orange tree in the third quarter was used as the symbol of the Orange Free State Republic.

The wagon in the fourth quarter represented the Transvaal.

The supporters - a springbok and a gemsbok (oryx) are taken from the arms of the Orange River Colony and the Cape Colony.

The lion holds four rods, bound together, symbolising the unification of the four former colonies.

The motto, Ex Unitate Vires was officially translated as "Union is Strength" until 1961, and thereafter as "Unity is Strength".






The six pence featured six occurrences of the four bound rods.

Three occurrences of these bound rods also appeared on the three pence coin.

Bound rods also featured on some of the early South African decimal coins.





Hope featured on the shilling and later on the 10 cents coin.


CoA of the Transvaal Province.jpg

Coat of arms of the Transvaal Province.




The Voortrekker wagon featured on the first decimal 1 cent coin.



Natal arms.jpg

The emblem of the Natal Province featured two wildebeest.

KwaZulu-Natal CoA.jpg

The current KwaZulu-Natal coat of arms includes a wildebeest.




The wildebeest featured on the 2 cents coin of 1965 onward.



From 1990 onwards it appeared on the 5 rand coins: monometallic and bimetallic.


Orange River Colony coat of arms.jpg

The Orange River Colony coat of arms featured a springbok




The springbok appeared on the 5 shillings coin.



It appeared on the 1 rand coin of 1965 to 1990 and appears on the later version too.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The first Bulgarian post-communist coins of the 1990s all show a sun face (and a fish) on the reverse.

Apparently the two symbols represent the "founding nations" of Bulgaria: the Slavs and the Thracians.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

chrisild

Interesting, I had no idea about that. So Sun = Thracians and Fish = Slavs? Strange that "founding nations" did not get larger symbols. I had thought those were simply mintmarks and designer signs.

stef

Quote from: chrisild on October 11, 2022, 08:35:49 PMInteresting, I had no idea about that. So Sun = Thracians and Fish = Slavs?
I don't think there is such a separation - the sun and the fish can be symbols of both peoples.


chrisild


<k>



Australia, predecimal set.


Long ago, I noticed the stars on the Australian ram shilling.

They are near the rim of the coin.

I assumed that they were merely space-fillers.

Not so. The represent the Commonwealth star.


This seven-pointed star symbolises the Federation of Australia.

The Federation came into force on 1 January 1901.

Six points of the Star represent the six original states of the Commonwealth of Australia.

The seventh point represents the territories and any future states.


Interestingly, the star was omitted from the three pence coin.

Presumably that was because that coin was so small.


See also:

1] Coins with rim devices.

2] Predecimal coinage of the Commonwealth of Australia.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.