Author Topic: Laos, 20 kip nd (1979) Pick#28  (Read 3648 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Asgorath

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 58
    • My colection of coins is here
Laos, 20 kip nd (1979) Pick#28
« on: January 10, 2010, 01:54:46 AM »
Hi.
What would be this note country?
Thanks




« Last Edit: August 29, 2011, 10:47:35 PM by Figleaf »
"The Dark Side Clouds Everything. Impossible To See The Future Is."

RHM22

  • Guest
Re: What's the country of this banknote?
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2010, 02:19:57 AM »
Hello, Asgorath. I believe this is a 20 kip note from Laos.

Offline wilhem

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 34
    • williamcollection
Re: What's the country of this banknote?
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2010, 01:00:37 AM »
Hi Asgorath,
I'm agree with RHM22, this is a 20kip from Lao, known in the Pick catalogue with the reference #28, not date(1979),red and brown-red.
See pictures attached

Regards.
French collector of Coins & Banknotes of the World.

One day there will be no borders,no bundaries, no flags and no countries, and the only passport will be the heart (Santana)

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 28 235
Re: What's the country of this banknote?
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2010, 10:45:25 AM »
The tank on the note is a Russian T54/55. This is now an antiquity, so the picture is a wee bit less impressive than intended when the note was designed.

Not sure what's being produced in the textile factory on the other side.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Zantetsuken

  • Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 235
Re: What's the country of this banknote?
« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2010, 05:06:46 AM »
Nice note 'Asgorath'. It was interesting that Laos was the only country outside the Soviet Union to use the hammer and sickle on their state arms. The arms was revised in 1995, by replacing the the hammer and sickle, and power-lines with a temple.

~Daniel

RHM22

  • Guest
Re: What's the country of this banknote?
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2010, 02:46:26 PM »
Transnistria continues to use the hammer and sickle, but that was formerly part of the Soviet Union. The Chinese Soviet Republic also used the hammer and sickle on their flag and coat of arms.

« Last Edit: January 29, 2010, 03:17:41 PM by Zantetsuken »

Offline Zantetsuken

  • Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 235
Re: What's the country of this banknote?
« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2010, 03:18:13 PM »
Transnistria continues to use the hammer and sickle, but that was formerly part of the Soviet Union. The Chinese Soviet Republic also used the hammer and sickle on their flag and coat of arms.



True that. The only difference would be is that Laos was and still is an official nation, whereas the Chinese Soviet Republic and Transnistria were/are self-proclaimed republics and not internationally recognised. But your right, in that they both used the hammer and sickle in their state arms as well. I overlooked this point. Thanks.

~Daniel

RHM22

  • Guest
Re: What's the country of this banknote?
« Reply #7 on: January 29, 2010, 03:31:28 PM »
Actually, the Austrian coat of arms also has a hammer and sickle! Of course this wouldn't be considered a communist symbol. Also, the Soviet Chinese coat of arms I mentioned earlier might not be counted because it is somewhat crude.

Offline chrisild

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8 261
  • NW DE EU
Re: What's the country of this banknote?
« Reply #8 on: January 29, 2010, 03:48:36 PM »
Actually, the Austrian coat of arms also has a hammer and sickle!

Right, but that is quite different. Austria never used a CoA with that circle of ears, for example. The eagle of the First Republic had a hammer (symbol of the industrial workers), a sickle (symbolizing the peasants or agriculture) and a mural crown (in heraldry often a symbol of a free city, but also of its citizens). So yes, post-WW1 Austria wanted to emphasize the "productive classes" this way, and no, it is not a communist symbol.

The "Austrofascist" regime (mid-1930s) did not use the hammer and sickle, and later, when Austria was part of Nazi Germany, that symbol was of course not used either. Today's Austria, the Second Republic, has the eagle with these three symbols again, but also a broken chain referring to the liberation.

Christian
« Last Edit: January 29, 2010, 03:55:11 PM by chrisild »