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Queen Victoria's twin sister

Started by brandm24, August 27, 2022, 11:24:36 PM

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brandm24

This is one of the more interesting double struck coins I've ever seen. Though it's obviously just a shadow image of the Queen, it appears almost like a double-portrait issue like the coinage of William & Mary.

One thing that does puzzle me about the strike is the circular "bald spot" behind the Queen's head. It probably has something to do with a design element that I'm just not seeing. Any thoughts?

BruceVictoria error 1.jpgVictoria error 2.jpg 
Always Faithful

Tirant

I think that bald spot, what could seem to be a counterstamp at first thought, is just a visual effect caused by the double struck. Notice that it has the same shape than Victoria's nape, and what's "inside" is just her hairlace. Look at this "only once struck" piece and compare:



Figleaf

A puzzling effect. Here is a scenario that may explain it.

When this coin was struck first, the die with the portrait broke. The piece that broke off got in the way of the mechanism that should have ejected the coin, so that it got stuck in the press (edge damage just above 9 o'clock). The broken upper die came down again (second portrait and Britannia), of course not making an impact where the broken off die piece had been (the unaffected part behind the first strike head).

This time, the coin got ejected, but a minter who had been agape at the sudden loud sounds suddenly found a sharp piece of die in his mouth. In the confusion, as he was guided to the doctor, nobody thought of removing the funny double-struck coin from the bucket below the coin press. It should have been picked up at quality control, but when it passed, they were all busy taking their checkered caps off for the temporary assistant deputy lieutenant mint master who happened to pass by at that instance. Our minter, safely back in his pub that night, cleaned the small cut with a generous amount of medicinal lager while his friends teased him with his sharp-tongued girlfriend.

Meanwhile, the unlucky cross-eyed coin did its duty in circulation. Its only adventure was being owned by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who never noticed its defect. It regained its dignity only when you saved it from a rummage tray. ;D

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

brandm24

Quote from: Tirant on August 28, 2022, 08:47:48 AMI think that bald spot, what could seem to be a counterstamp at first thought, is just a visual effect caused by the double struck. Notice that it has the same shape than Victoria's nape, and what's "inside" is just her hairlace. Look at this "only once struck" piece and compare:


Possible, but somehow to me it doesn't seem to fit right. I'm going to send the picture to some people who are very good at deciphering errors and their causes and see what they think.

Bruce
Always Faithful

brandm24

Quote from: Mister T on August 28, 2022, 09:06:38 AMImpressive - where did you find it?
It's presently being offered at auction. I'll bid on it but it may fetch more than I can afford.

Bruce
Always Faithful

brandm24

Peter, I've thought about the double strike more and now believe that your take is correct. Strangely, it took my searching through some counterstamped coins to bring me to my ah-ha moment.

The initial strike was normal but with the right shift on the second strike a full impression was impossible to achieve because of the raised portrait already in place. It merely impressed the details of the second portrait on the high points and left the fields unmarked. The lack of doubling of the edge lettering also supports this scenario. The "bald spot" is indeed the curve of the neck and upper back of the original strike.

I should have seen it right away. I know well that worn host coins were often chosen to counterstamp text on because it afforded a better canvas on which to display a message. If Joe Schmoe is advertising his wonderful corn flakes but no one can read his message then what's the point? ;D 

Bruce
 
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