Coinage of independent Guyana

Started by <k>, June 07, 2022, 01:14:17 AM

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<k>

#15
Guyana $5 1996.jpg

The 5 dollar coin was made of copper-plated steel, weighed 3.75 grams and had a diameter of 20.5 mm.

Like the 1 dollar coin, its obverse featured the coat of arms.

The reverse design featured sugar cane.

Sugar cane punt Guyana.jpg

A punt loaded with sugar cane in Guyana.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Guyana $10 1996.jpg

The 10 dollar coin was made of nickel-plated steel, weighed 5 grams and had a diameter of 23 mm.

Like the other coins, its obverse featured the coat of arms.


The coin was heptagonal, like the UK 50 pence coin.

Both the first and current series of coins were produced by the Royal Mint (UK).
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#17
Guyana $10 1997.jpg

The reverse design features a young gold worker in the process of washing gold.

The Bank of Guyana describes the scene as:

A legendary "pork-knocker" engaged in traditional small-scale mining gold mining.

From Wikpedia:

Pork-knockers are freelance Guyanese prospectors who mine for diamonds and gold in the alluvial plains of the Guyanese interior. Pork-knockers have been responsible for discovering large deposits of gold and diamonds. The name "pork-knockers" refers to their regular diet of pickled pork of wild pig that is often eaten at the end of the day. Caribbean author A. R. F. Webber suggested that the term may have originated as "pork-barrel knocker".
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Sean Thomas designed the reverse of the $1 coin.

Selwyn Cambridge designed the reverse of the $5 coin.

Ignatious Adams. designed the reverse of the $10 coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

From 1976 to 1980 the Franklin Mint produced a set of "circulation-like" collector coins for Guyana. By "circulation-like", I mean that they looked like a set of circulation coins with different denominations and thematic wildlife designs (1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 cents, $1, $5 and $10). Franklin and Guyana specifically intended them to look like a circulation set, and they did, but they never circulated. They were intended only to make money for Guyana and the Franklin Mint.

Some collectors were and are confused by those collector coins and mistake / mistook them for circulation coins. They were designed by the late artist and sculptor Michael Rizzello, who had worked for the Royal Mint (UK) before joining the Franklin Mint.

You can see that collector set here.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Guyana set.jpg

Here you see the current regular circulation coins side by side.

Image from Numiscollection.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Who knows what the implement in the water is?
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

stef

Quote from: <k> on June 07, 2022, 10:24:17 AMWho knows what the implement in the water is?
Sugarcane transportation punt?

<k>

Sugar cane punt Guyana.jpg

A punt loaded with sugar cane in Guyana.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.