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Canada: 150th anniversary of Confederation coin series

Started by <k>, May 28, 2022, 03:22:32 PM

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<k>

In 1967 Canada had celebrated the Centenary of its Confederation with a special circulating coin series, and in 2017 it did the same for the 150th anniversary of Confederation.

The 1967 series seemed quite a novelty at the time, but it was not the first such set in world coinage. Brazil had commemorated its 400th Anniversary of Colonisation in 1932 with a set of circulating commemorative coins.

In this topic, though, the focus is on Canada's coin series to commemorate the 150th anniversary of Confederation.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

The reverse of the 5 cents coin illustrated the theme of "Living Traditions" and featured a beaver.   N# 107156.

Image copyright of the Royal Canadian Mint.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Gerald Gloade created the 5 cents design. He is a graphics designer who recreated the 5 cents beaver design in the  tradition of his Algonkian heritage. He was also influenced by the wildlife theme of the 1967 commemorative centennial coins.

Image copyright of newswire.ca.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

The reverse of the 10 cents coin illustrated the theme of "Our Character". It featured the spirit of peacekeeping in a stylized design featuring an iconic maple leaf in the beak of a dove.   N# 105411.

Image copyright of the Royal Canadian Mint.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Amy Choi created the 10 cents design. She commented, "Since Canada is known world-wide for its desire to promote peace, cooperation and diversity, I was moved to combine the maple leaf and the dove as my way to show what I admire most about my country."

Image copyright of newswire.ca.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

The reverse of the 25 cents coin illustrated the theme of "Hope for a Green Future". It represented a child's hope for Canada's abundant nature to be preserved for years to come, featuring a pair of hands bringing life to a plant that connects all living things represented by some notable Canadian animals (a turtle, bird, and beaver).

N# 105411.

Image copyright of the Royal Canadian Mint.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Joelle Wong created the 25 cents design when she was only 8 years old.

Image copyright of newswire.ca.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

The 50 cents coin of this series was a collector coin only, whereas all the other coins circulated.

Apparently the Canadians do not like the 50 cents denomination at all and rarely use it.

The 50 cents coin featured the "Canada 150" logo that was especially created for the anniversary.

N# 107161.  Image copyright of the Royal Canadian Mint.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Here you see the Canada 150 logo.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Ariana Cuvin designed the Canada 150 logo that appeared on the 50 cents collector coin.

Image copyright of newswire.ca.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

The reverse of the 1 dollar coin illustrated the theme of "Connecting A Nation". It featured the iconic engineering achievements that dominate the Canadian landscape from east to west. It depicted landmarks such as Lion's Gate Bridge, a prairie grain elevator, the CN Tower, Quebec City's majestic Chateau Frontenac Hotel and an East Coast lighthouse.

N# 105470.  Image copyright of the Royal Canadian Mint.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Wesley Klassen designed the reverse of the $1 coin.

Image copyright of newswire.ca.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

The reverse of the 2 dollar coin illustrated the theme of "Dance of The Spirits". It featured the Northern Lights, which the Cree peoples called "the dance of the spirits".

According to the Royal Canadian Mint, "The reverse shows a pair of paddlers dwarfed by a night sky that is alive with the ever-shifting movement of the Aurora Borealis. The paddlers pause and gaze awestruck in wonder of the mesmerizing scene unfolding above them."

N# 105941.  Image copyright of the Royal Canadian Mint.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Dr. Timothy Hsia designed the reverse of the $2 coin.

Image copyright of newswire.ca.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

quaziright

Quote from: <k> on May 28, 2022, 03:52:15 PMWesley Klassen designed the reverse of the $1 coin.

Image copyright of newswire.ca.

I had the pleasure of meeting Wes at the Missisauga coin expo. He was signing coin cards of his loonie which I got myself a few samples. I chatted with him for a few mins and asked him if he typically dabbles in coin designs, it was more of a one off for him. He's a very nice guy and I have a photo with him too, but don't think it's on my phone anymore