News:

Sign up for the monthly zoom events by sending a PM with your email address to Hitesh

Main Menu

Coinage of Saint Pierre and Miquelon

Started by <k>, May 27, 2022, 07:24:20 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

<k>

Canada, Saint-Pierre et Miquelon.jpg


Saint-Pierre et Miquelon in relation to Canada.jpg


From Wikipedia:

Saint Pierre and Miquelon, officially the Territorial Collectivity of Saint-Pierre and Miquelon (French: Collectivité territoriale de Saint-Pierre et Miquelon), is a self-governing territorial overseas collectivity of France. It is located in the north-western Atlantic Ocean near the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

Saint Pierre and Miquelon is a remaining vestige of the once vast territory of New France. Its residents are French citizens. The collectivity elects its own deputy to the National Assembly and participates in senatorial and presidential elections. It covers 242 km2 (93 square miles) of land and shores and had a population of 6008 as of the March 2016 census, of which 5412 lived in Saint-Pierre and 596 in Miquelon-Langlade.

Saint Pierre Island is one of the three main islands of Saint Pierre and Miquelon.  Saint-Pierre is French for Saint Peter, the patron saint of fishermen. The island has an area of 26 square kilometres (10 square miles) and contains the town of Saint-Pierre, which lies on the island's east coast and is the main population centre of the island group. Saint Pierre and its neighbouring islands form the Saint-Pierre commune, one of two communes in Saint Pierre and Miquelon (the other being Miquelon-Langlade). The island is accessible by ferry from Newfoundland and has immigration control for the country of France.

Despite being smaller in area than Miquelon, Saint Pierre Island is the most populous island and the commercial and administrative center of the archipelago. Saint-Pierre Airport has been in operation since 1999 and is capable of accommodating long-haul flights from France. Several smaller islands lie off the coast of Saint Pierre.

Miquelon-Langlade is the larger and less populated of the two communes (municipalities) that make up the French overseas collectivity of Saint Pierre and Miquelon. Miquelon-Langlade consists of three geological islands: Miquelon, Langlade and Le Cap, which are connected by tombolos. A tombolo is a sandy isthmus. The communal seat is the settlement of Miquelon, on the northern tip, where the entire island's permanent population of 580 (as of 2019) is located. Miquelon Airport provides flights to Montreal and to nearby Saint-Pierre.

Miquelon Island is situated between Le Cap Island to the north and Langlade Island (also called Petite Miquelon) to the south. The name Miquelon purportedly derived from a Basque nickname for "Michael" (Mikel) and evolved over time into Miclon, Micklon, and finally Miquelon (Mikelune in Basque).


Below you see a map of Saint Pierre and Miquelon in relation to Canada.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#1
Saint-Pierre et Miquelon from the air.jpg

Here you see the islands from the air.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#2
Map of Saint-Pierre et Miquelon.jpg


Here you see a map of the islands. In the north is Le Cap (The Cape). Presqu'île du Cap is French for Peninsula of the Cape. South of Le Cap is Grande Miquelon (Greater Miquelon). South of Grande Miquelon is Petite Miquelon (Lesser Miquelon, or Little Miquelon). These three islands form the commune of Miquelon-Langlade. To the east of Miquelon lies Saint-Pierre.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#3
Saint-Pierre-.jpg

Saint-Pierre.


From Britannica:

The first explorer to visit the archipelago was a Portuguese, José Alvarez Faguendez, who landed there in 1520. The first permanent French fishing settlement was established in 1604. The islands were subsequently exchanged between the French and British several times until restored permanently to France in 1816 under the Treaty of Paris (1814). The islands became a French overseas territory in 1946 and then, in 1976, an overseas département, on a presumed par with the départements of metropolitan France.

In May 1985 the islands were given a new status with a new name, collectivité, because the former departmental arrangement conflicted with the tariff structure of the European Community (now European Union), to which France belongs. A long-standing border dispute with Newfoundland was resolved in 1992, granting Saint-Pierre and Miquelon an economic zone of 3607 square nautical miles (6680 km).

The archipelago was first settled by immigrant seafarers from western France (mainly Basques, Normans, and Bretons) early in the 17th century. The inhabitants speak French and adhere to French customs and traditions; the majority of the population is Roman Catholic.

The importance attached to this last foothold in North America has led France to subsidize the islands, since the meagre local resources cannot support the population; about 70 percent of the islands' supplies are imported from Canada or from France via Nova Scotia. Cod fishing is still virtually the only occupation; frozen and dried fish, as well as fish flour, are the main exports.

The islands are presided over by a French-appointed prefect, who is assisted by a privy council and an elected general council. The inhabitants possess French citizenship and suffrage. Primary education is free and mostly parochial. Saint-Pierre, the territorial capital, is the seat of the law courts and the apostolic prefecture.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#4
Coat of arms of Saint-Pierre et Miquelon.jpg


Saint Pierre and Miquelon has an unofficial flag (not shown here), but its official flag is the French tricolour.

The coat of arms of Saint Pierre and Miquelon is the official heraldic symbol of the French overseas collectivity of Saint Pierre and Miquelon. The main part of the shield is blue with a yellow ship, said to represent the Grande Hermine, which brought Jacques Cartier to Saint Pierre on June 15, 1536. Three square flags placed along the top recall the origin of most inhabitants of the islands: from left to right, Basques, Bretons, and Normans. It is crowned with a naval crown
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

From Wikipedia:

The Saint Pierre and Miquelon franc was the currency of Saint Pierre and Miquelon for a short period of time. Before 1890 the French franc and the Canadian dollar both circulated on the islands. These were supplemented with local banknotes from 1890. The exchange rate of 5.4 francs = 1 dollar was used on the island, although the exchange rate from the two gold standards was 5.1826 francs = 1 dollar. After the franc left the gold standard, only the franc circulated.

During the Second World War a full set of banknotes was introduced for the islands. In 1945 Saint Pierre and Miquelon adopted a franc tied to the CFA franc, thus avoiding some of the devaluation imposed on the metropolitan currency (see Réunion franc). Coins were issued for the islands in 1948.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#6
Saint-Pierre et Miquelon obverse.jpg


Saint Pierre and Miquelon's only coins were aluminium 1 and 2 francs coins, which were struck in 1948.

Below you see the common obverse of the coins. It was designed by French engraver Lucien Bazor. This superb design showed Marianne, the personification of the Republic of France, with ships in the background, which symbolise the fact that Saint Pierre and Miquelon was an overseas territory of France.

The legend on the obverse translates as "French Republic" and "French Union".

From Wikipedia:

The French Union (French: Union française) was a political entity created by the French Fourth Republic to replace the old French colonial empire system, which was colloquially known as the "French Empire" (Empire français). It was the formal end of the "indigenous" (indigène) status of French subjects in colonial areas.

See: French Union.

Image is copyright of Heritage Auctions.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>


The aluminium 1 franc coin weighed 1.35 grams and had a diameter of 23 mm.   N# 6008.

The reverse design was once more by Lucien Bazor.

It featured a schooner used for cod fishing. The denomination was separated by two cod fillets.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#8
SPM 2f 1948.jpg


The aluminium 2 francs coin weighed 2.14 grams and had a diameter of 26.95 mm.  N# 1288.

Apart from the denomination, the reverse design was the same as that of the 1 franc coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

In 1960 Saint Pierre and Miquelon adopted the new French franc. 50 old francs were equal to 1 new franc. Local banknotes were used until 1965, when the islands began using French currency, along with Canadian currency. The islands continued to use both French and Canadian currencies. The euro replaced the franc in 2002.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

chrisild

Funny by the way that there still are special "Saint-Pierre-et-Miquelon" postal stamps. You know, those things that you may put on an envelope when you want to mail a lett-- errm, never mind. 8)

Figleaf

Are you sure about the 50 to 1 exchange rate for the St. Pierre & Miquelon franc? Elsewhere, the rate was/is 100 francs CFA/CFP to 1 new franc and 100 old francs to 1 new franc in France.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

<k>

#12
Quote from: Figleaf on May 28, 2022, 08:38:59 AMAre you sure about the 50 to 1 exchange rate for the St. Pierre & Miquelon franc? Elsewhere, the rate was/is 100 francs CFA/CFP to 1 new franc and 100 old francs to 1 new franc in France.

Peter

That's what Wikipedia tells me.  See: Saint Pierre and Miquelon franc.

Do you have any other sources?



"The CFA Franc Zone: Currency Union and Monetary Standard" By Mr.James M. Boughton.

See screenshot below.


CFA franc.jpg
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.