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What became of Bob & Sandra?

Started by brandm24, April 11, 2022, 08:48:47 PM

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brandm24

One of the attractions to me of collecting and researching counterstamps is the backstory that goes with a name, slogan, or image someone thought important enough to strike on a coin. All pieces have a backstory though the purpose of most will never be known.

The late researcher Dr.Gregory Brunk described them as "Advertising on the world's smallest billboards" and indeed they are. Their meaning or purpose is often a mystery that defies the most dedicated researchers but to many the hunt is the attraction. I've worked for many years in an effort to decode some of these mysteries and haven't always been successful. But the process has been fun and educational and I don't regret a second of the journey.

This counterstamped British Half Penny...likely from the 1940s...is a good example. Who were Bob and Sandra and what became of them? What did they need luck for...their marriage, children, a future together, turmoil in their lives? Of course we don't know that and never will. Interesting to contemplate though isn't it? And to Bob and Sandra, I hope your lives were well lived.

BruceBob & Sandra 1.jpgBob & Sandra 2.jpg 
Always Faithful

FosseWay

Here is my stream-of-consciousness guess  :D

If we start from a presumption that the countermark is British, I think this is considerably later than the 1940s (though obviously the host coin is 1937-1948). There are a few clues:

- Sandra is not a common first name in the first two or three decades of the 20th century. 12 girls were registered in England and Wales with the name between 1900 and 1925. Conversely, when I search 1925-1950 I get the error message "This search yields more than 50 000 results".

- "FAB" and "YEH" are typical 1960s slang, not 1940s. I'm figuring "GEAR" refers to drugs - I can't think what other context it might be used in here - and again, it was popular in that meaning in the 1960s.

- "MOD" - I don't know if the retrograde D means something or is a mistake by the puncher - is this a reference to Mods as in Mods and Rockers, two youth countercultures of the 1960s and early 1970s that were always at loggerheads? If so, again it points to a time considerably later than the 1940s.

Conclusion: I'd date this to the 1960s or early 1970s.

brandm24

I meant to say the coin was likely from the 1940s but didn't make that clear enough. You're probably right about dating the stamps to the 1960s or 70s. The coin shows some decent wear so obviously circulated for awhile. The stamps are in much better shape. Must have sat in Bob's / Sandra's dresser drawer for a long time. :)

Bruce
Always Faithful

Figleaf

I get the impression that the impressionist who impressed the letters on this coin did not have a complete alphabet at his disposal and was improvising with replacement letters, e.g. in GEAR. I tried replacing the G with another letter he didn't use in that size. I take the retrograde D in MOD for an upside down D (like the upside down BOB).

How about the largest size punches: BOE? All I can think of is Bank of England, but it doesn't fit access to the punches.

Also, if Sandra and Bob were 18 - 28 in 1960 (sort of worst case scenario), they may well still be alive today.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

FosseWay

The big text across the middle is BOB, it's just that the right-hand side of the B is weak.

I don't understand what you mean about GEAR - all the letters look more or less in proportion to each other and correctly formed.

Tirant

Maybe it was some kind of promotion token for a music duo from the 60s:

Bob the Mod & Fabulous Sandra, introducing their new single: The Good Luck Gear, by Yeh records.

Or maybe not...  ::)

brandm24

Quote from: Tirant on April 12, 2022, 03:26:48 PMMaybe it was some kind of promotion token for a music duo from the 60s:

Bob the Mod & Fabulous Sandra, introducing their new single: The Good Luck Gear, by Yeh records.

Or maybe not...  ::)
Love your imagination, Tirant, but Yeh should be spelled Yeah...right?...maybe...well, I don't really know. ;D

By the way, I contacted the seller of the coin and he told me that he didn't know who Bob and Sandra were but does remember getting the coin in change in the 1960s. You guys were right about the date then. He lives in the UK but doesn't remember where he was when he got it.

Bruce
Always Faithful

WillieBoyd2

Bobby Darin and Sandra Dee, two American film and music personalities from the 1960's.

:)
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brandm24

Quote from: WillieBoyd2 on April 13, 2022, 05:32:11 PMBobby Darin and Sandra Dee, two American film and music personalities from the 1960's.

:)
:perfect:

Bruce
Always Faithful