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Uruguay: wildlife-themed circulation coin series of 2011

Started by <k>, April 11, 2022, 04:37:30 PM

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<k>

the Oriental Republic of the Uruguay covers an area of approximately 176,000 square kilometers (68,000 sq mi) and has a population of an estimated 3.51 million, of whom 2 million live in the metropolitan area of its capital and largest city, Montevideo.

Uruguay was colonized by Europeans late relative to neighboring countries. The Spanish founded Montevideo as a military stronghold in the early 18th century because of the competing claims over the region. Uruguay won its independence between 1811 and 1828, following a four-way struggle between Portugal and Spain, and later Argentina and Brazil. Uruguay is today a democratic constitutional republic, with a president who serves as both head of state and head of government.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Uruguay.jpg

The location of Uruguay in South America.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>


From Wikipedia:

The coat of arms of Uruguay was first adopted by law on March 19, 1829. It consists of an oval, which is divided into four equal sections and crowned by a rising golden sun, the "Sun of May", symbolizing the rising of the Uruguayan nation. The oval is surrounded by a laurel branch on the left and an olive one on the right, representing honor and peace, joined at the bottom by a blue ribbon.

In the upper left quarter there is a scale, symbol of equality and justice, set on a blue background. The upper right quarter contains the Cerro de Montevideo (Montevideo Hill) with its fortress on the summit, which represents strength, on a silver background.

In the lower left, also on a silver background, there is a galloping horse, symbolizing liberty. The lower right quarter holds an ox, which is a symbol of abundance, on a blue background.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Flag of Uruguay.png


From Wikipedia:

The horizontal stripes on the Uruguayan flag represent the nine original departments of Uruguay, based on the U.S. flag, where the stripes represent the original 13 colonies. The first flag designed in 1828 had 9 light blue stripes; this number was reduced to 4 in 1830 due to visibility problems from distance.

The golden Sun of May represents the May Revolution of 1810; the Sun of May is a figurative sun that represents Inti, the sun god and mythological founder of the Incan Empire. It also appears in the Flag of Argentina and the Coat of Arms of Bolivia.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Uruguay $1  2012.jpg


Uruguay adopted a new series of coins in 2011.

The common obverse of the series featured the national coat of arms.


The lowest denomination of the series was the $1 peso coin.  Numista N# 19103.

The $1 peso coin was made of brass-plated steel.

It weighed 3.5 grams and had a diameter of 20 mm.

The reverse design featured an armadillo.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Armadillo.jpg

An armadillo.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Uruguay $2 2011-.jpg


The 2 pesos coin was made of brass-plated steel.  Numista N# 19104..

It weighed 4.5 grams and had a diameter of 23 mm.

Below you see the obverse design of the coin.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Uruguay $2 2011.jpg


Numista N# 19104.

The reverse of the 2 pesos coin featured a capybara.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Capybara.jpg


From Wikipedia:

The capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) is a giant cavy rodent native to South America. It is the largest living rodent and a member of the genus Hydrochoerus. The only other extant member is the lesser capybara (Hydrochoerus isthmius). Its close relatives include guinea pigs and rock cavies, and it is more distantly related to the agouti, the chinchilla, and the nutria. The capybara inhabits savannas and dense forests and lives near bodies of water. It is a highly social species and can be found in groups as large as 100 individuals, but usually lives in groups of 10–20 individuals. The capybara is hunted for its meat and hide and also for grease from its thick fatty skin. It is not considered a threatened species.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>




The 5 pesos coin was made of brass-plated steel.  Nuimista N# 22259.

Its obverse (not shown) featured the national emblem, as on the 1 and 2 pesos coins.


The coin weighed 6 grams and had a diameter of 26 mm.

Above you see the reverse design of the coin.

It featured a rhea.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Rhea.jpg

The rhea is native to South America. It is distantly related to the ostrich and the emu.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Uruguay $10  2011-.jpg


The 10 pesos coin was the highest denomination of the series.  Numista N# 22257.

The coin was bimetallic.

It had a brass-plated steel centre within a nickel-plated steel ring.


The coin weighed 10.5 grams and had a diameter of 28 mm.

The obverse featured the national emblem.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Uruguay $10 pesos-2011.jpg


Numista N# 22257.

The reverse design of the 10 pesos coin featured a cougar.

The cougar is also known as a puma and a mountain lion.
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<k>



Uruguay, 1 peso, 1942.


Numista N# 10344.

The design of the puma was copied from Frenchman Pierre-Alexandre Morlon's design, which was used on the 10 centésimos coins of 1930 and 1936 and also the 1942 1 peso coin of 1942.

See also: Numismatic heritage: circulation designs that have been reused.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Puma.jpg


From Wikipedia:

The cougar (Puma concolor) is a large cat native to the Americas. Its range spans from the Canadian Yukon to the southern Andes in South America and is the most widespread of any large wild terrestrial mammal in the Western Hemisphere. It is an adaptable, generalist species, occurring in most American habitat types. Due to its wide range, it has many names, including puma, mountain lion, catamount and panther.

The cougar is the second-largest cat in the New World, after the jaguar (Panthera onca).
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.