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Colombia: wildlife coin series of 2012

Started by <k>, April 10, 2022, 04:00:57 PM

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<k>

From Wikipedia:

The Republic of Colombia is a transcontinental country spanning South America and an insular region in North America. It covers an area of 1,141,748 square kilometers (440,831 sq miles), with a population of 50 million. Colombia's rich cultural heritage reflects influences by various Amerindian civilizations, European settlement, African slaves, and immigration from Europe and the Middle East. Spanish is the nation's official language, besides which over 70 languages are spoken.

Colombia has been inhabited by various indigenous peoples since at least 12,000 BCE. The Spanish landed first in La Guajira in 1499 and by the mid-16th century colonized parts of the region, establishing the New Kingdom of Granada, with Santa Fé de Bogotá as its capital. Independence from the Spanish Empire was achieved in 1819, with what is now Colombia emerging as the United Provinces of New Granada. The new nation experimented with federalism as the Granadine Confederation (1858), and then the United States of Colombia (1863), before the Republic of Colombia was finally declared in 1886. Panama seceded in 1903, leading to Colombia's present borders. Beginning in the 1960s, the country has suffered from an asymmetric low-intensity armed conflict and political violence, both of which escalated in the 1990s. Since 2005, there has been significant improvement in security, stability, and rule of law, as well as unprecedented economic growth and development.

Colombia is one of the world's seventeen megadiverse countries, and has the second-highest level of biodiversity in the world. Its territory encompasses Amazon rainforest, highlands, grasslands, and deserts, and it is the only country in South America with coastlines and islands along both Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

Colombia is a member of various global and regional organizations including the United Nations, the Pacific Alliance and the Andean Community. Its diversified economy is the third-largest in South America, with macroeconomic stability and favorable long-term growth prospects.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#1
Colombia map.gif

Map of Colombia.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#2
Coat of arms of Colombia.jpg


From Wikpedia:

The coat of arms of Colombia contains a shield with numerous symbols. Perched on top of the shield is an Andean condor holding an olive crown and the condor symbolizing freedom. The national motto, Libertad y Orden (Spanish for Liberty and Order), appears on a scroll in between the bird and the shield in black font over golden background. The condor is depicted with his wings extended and looking to the right.

The national flag is draped on each side of the shield. The shield is broken into three portions. In the lowermost portion is a depiction of ships, pointing to the maritime history of Colombia, mainly to the Isthmus of Panama, which was part of Colombia until 1903. Nowadays represents the two oceans that border the country (Atlantic and Pacific). The sails mean the Colombian commerce with the rest of the world and the rising economy. In the middle section, over a field of silver (argent), the Phrygian cap is presented; this being a traditional symbol of liberty and freedom. The topmost section contains a pomegranate over a blue (azure) field, as a symbol of the Vice royalty of New Granada (early colonial name of Colombia back in the 18th century), in the middle flanked by two cornucopias or horns of plenty: the one at the right with golden and silver coins and the one at the left with tropical fruits. This portion represents the agricultural and mineral wealth of Colombian soil.

The coat of arms of the Republic was designed by Francisco de Paula Santander, and was adopted via Act 3 of 9 May 1834, with later non-essential modifications according to Ordinance 861 of 1924.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#3
Flag of Colombia.png


From Wikipedia:

The national flag of Colombia symbolises Colombian independence from Spain, gained on 20 July 1810. It is a horizontal tricolor of yellow, blue and red.

Yellow represents the riches of the country, the wealth of the Colombian soil, the gold, sovereignty, harmony, justice and agriculture, as well as the sun, the source of light.

Blue represents the sky above, the seas on Colombia's shores, and the rivers that run through it.

Red represents the blood spilled for Colombia's independence and also the effort of Colombian people, their determination and perseverance. It represents that although Colombia's people once struggled, they have since thrived.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

In 2012 the Bank of the Republic of Colombia issued a new series of coins. Its wildlife themes marked a surprising departure from its previous designs that featured mainly military heroes from the 1800s.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#5
Colombia 50 pesos 2016.jpg


Numista N# 34774.

The lowest denomination of the series was the 50 pesos coin.

It was made of nickel-plated steel.

It weighed 2 grams and had a diameter of 17 mm.

Below you see the obverse of the coin.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#6


The reverse of the coin featured a spectacled bear (Tremarctos ornatus).
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#7
Spectacled-Bear.jpg

The spectacled bear.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#8
Colombia 100 pesos 2016.jpg


Numista N# 34772.

The 100 pesos coin was made of brass-plated steel.

It weighed 3.34 grams and had a diameter of 20.3 mm.

Below you see the obverse of the coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#9



The reverse of the coin featured the Espeletia plant, commonly known as frailejón.

It is a genus of perennial subshrubs of the family Asteraceae.

It is endemic mainly to Colombia, Venezuela and Ecuador.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#10
Frailejon plants, Colombia-.jpg

Frailejón plants.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#11
Colombia 200 pesos 2016.jpg


Numista N# 1051.

The 200 pesos coin was made of nickel-brass.

It weighed 4.61 grams and had a diameter of 22.4 mm.

Below you see the obverse of the coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#12
Colombia 200 pesos.jpg

The reverse of the coin featured a scarlet macaw (Ara macao).
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#13
Scarlet macaw.jpg

A scarlet macaw.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#14
Colombia 500 pesos 2016.jpg


Numista N# 34774.

The 500 pesos coin was bimetallic.

It had an aluminium-bronze centre within a nickel-brass ring.

It weighed 7.4 grams and had a diameter of 23.8 mm.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.