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Saint Christopher and Saint Vincent: unissued designs of 1975

Started by <k>, February 23, 2022, 05:18:37 PM

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<k>

St Kitts-sketch 1975.jpg

Image copyright of the Royal Mint.


In 1975 the Royal Mint (UK) asked Michael Rizzello to prepare designs for Saint Christopher and and Saint Vincent.

The two countries today are both sovereign states and Commonwealth realms.

King Charles III is their head of state.


The design above was intended for a silver $10 coin for Saint Christopher.

It features a map of the island and a ship.

These symbolise the first settlement by the English in 1623.


Saint Christopher is known informally as St. Kitts.

It was the first of the British West Indies Islands to be settled.

It was the base from which many others were colonised.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

St Kitts-sketch 1975-.jpg

Image copyright of the Royal Mint.


This a design that was intended for a gold $250 coin for Saint Christopher.

It features Brimstone Hill Fort, the most famous of the island's monuments.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

St Vincent-sketch 1975.jpg

Image copyright of the Royal Mint.


This design was intended for a silver $10 coin for Saint Vincent.

The design features arrowroot.

Saint Vincent has been called the arrowroot capital of the world.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

St Vincent-sketch 1975-.jpg

Image copyright of the Royal Mint.


This design was intended for a gold $250 coin for Saint Vincent.

The design features breadfruit.

Breadfruit was taken to Saint Vincent from Tahiti by Captain Bligh.

The fruit then gradually spread throughout the Caribbean.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

These designs were originally intended for coins for the collectors market.

Ultimately, the designs and the intended coins were never issued.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.