Unusual counterstamp

Started by brandm24, January 15, 2022, 03:08:08 PM

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brandm24

This odd counterstamped US Shield Nickel is something I haven't seen before and makes me wonder what the purpose of it is. It's neatly stamped on a heavily worn though undamaged coinl. While the date is worn off, by the design elements...rays between the stars...it would have to be either 1866 or 1867.

Someone or many people took to heart the issuers plea to keep it in circulation as the extreme wear shows. A very odd piece for sure. Any ideas?

Bruce
Always Faithful

Figleaf

I can think of multiple options.

The counterstamper didn't like the liberty head successor, possible because of the V instead of a 5 or because the new coin could be gilded and spent for 100 times its denomination, refusing to use coins with the new design. Or maybe he was afraid the 2 and 3 cent pieces would spell the end for the 5 cent coin.

However, my favourite explanation is something I can illustrate with a trick I pulled. I manoeuvred the ownership of my mother's bank account in such a way that the account is now in the name of my daughter. She now has a bank account number with such a low number of positions (6, against 21 for my shiny new French bank account) it attracts comments, but always turns out to be correct. I was inspired by one of my bosses, an American whose name was the same as that of his father and his son. His son is still using his grandfather's bank account, on the correct name, but with a date of birth in the 19th century. Now imagine coming across your counterstamped coin in circulation well over a century after it was struck. You see?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

brandm24

#2
Quote from: Figleaf on January 15, 2022, 08:35:34 PM
However, my favourite explanation is something I can illustrate with a trick I pulled. I manoeuvred the ownership of my mother's bank account in such a way that the account is now in the name of my daughter. She now has a bank account number with such a low number of positions (6, against 21 for my shiny new French bank account) it attracts comments, but always turns out to be correct. I was inspired by one of my bosses, an American whose name was the same as that of his father and his son. His son is still using his grandfather's bank account, on the correct name, but with a date of birth in the 19th century. Now imagine coming across your counterstamped coin in circulation well over a century after it was struck. You see?

Peter

Interesting theory.  :perfect:

Bruce
Always Faithful

JBK

#3
Hey Bruce...

I haven't logged on in a while, and to my surprise I found this counterstamped nickel pictured, which I won on ebay.

Not sure about it's purpose but it does appear to be an old counterstamp. I figured a collector with too much time on their hands was trying to encourage the circulation of old coins.

Since I occassionally use my SPEND ME punch on old coins or rarely circulated denominations I figured this one was destined for me.

Here is a Vatican 50 cent coin with my own instructions added.  :)

brandm24

Good to see you here again. It's been a long time, my friend.

I thought of your "SPEND ME" coins when I saw the stamp too. I still haven't figured out the reason for the slogan. It looks like it was a pocket-piece for all the wear on it, and if it was, the issuer got his wish even if it circulated in his pocket. ;D

Bruce
Always Faithful