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Coinage of Guinea

Started by <k>, December 20, 2021, 04:04:18 PM

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<k>

#15
Guinea 100 francs.jpg


Guinea issued a 100 francs coin in 1971.

Curiously, it was a collector coin only and did not circulate.

It was produced by the Royal Mint (UK).

The copper-nickel coin weighed 16.8 g and had a diameter of 34 mm.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#16
Guinea 50 cauris 1971.jpg


In 1971, the franc was replaced by the syli, at a rate of 1 syli to 10 francs.

There were 100 cauris to the syli.

The cauri was named after the cowry shell.

The lowest denomination of the new series was the 50 cauris.

It featured a cowry shell on the obverse.

An olive wreath appeared on the reverse.

The coin was made of aluminium.

It weighed 0.68 g and had a diameter of 19 mm.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#17
Guinea 1 syli 1971.jpg


The 1 syli coin featured Patrice Lumumba on the obverse.

He served as the first Prime Minister of the independent Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Following his assassination, he was widely seen as a martyr for the wider Pan-African movement.


The coin was made of aluminium.

It weighed 1.15 g and had a diameter of 22 mm.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#18
Guinea 1 syli 1971-.jpg

An olive wreath appeared on the reverse of the 1 syli coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#19
Guinea 2 sylis 1971.jpg


The 2 sylis coin featured Alpha Yaya Diallo on the obverse.

Alpha Yaya Diallo is a Guinean-born Canadian guitarist, singer and songwriter.


The coin was made of aluminium.

It weighed 2 g and had a diameter of 25 mm.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#20
Guinea 2 sylis 1971-.jpg

An olive wreath appeared on the reverse of the 2 sylis coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#21
Guinea 5 sylis 1971~.jpg


The 5 sylis coin featured Samori Ture on the obverse.

Samori Ture was a Muslim cleric, a military strategist, and the founder and leader of the Wassoulou Empire.

He was the great-grandfather of Guinea's first president, Ahmed Sékou Touré.


The coin was made of aluminium.

It weighed 2.27 g and had a diameter of 28 mm.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#22
Guinea 5 sylis 1971-.jpg

An olive wreath appeared on the reverse of the 5 sylis coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#23
Guinea 1985-.jpg


The Guinean franc was reintroduced as Guinea's currency in 1985, at par with the syli.

1, 5 and 10 franc coins were issued in 1985.

They were all made of brass-plated steel.


The 1 franc coin weighed 1.4 g and had a diameter of 15.5 mm.

The 5 francs coin weighed 2 g and had a diameter of 17.5 mm.

The 10 francs coin weighed 2.95 g and had a diameter of 20.4 mm.


The obverse designs, seen below, featured the national emblem.

They also included the denomination in words.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#24
Guinea 1985#.jpg

The reverse designs showed a palm leaf and the denomination in numerals.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#25
Guinea 25  francs 1987.jpg


A brass 25 francs coin was added to the series in 1987.

It weighed 4.86 g and had a diameter of 22.5 mm.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#26
Guinea 50  francs 1994.jpg


Guinea's final circulation coin was issued in 1994.

The 50 francs coin was made of copper-nickel.

It weighed 7 g and had a diameter of 26 mm.


The reverse design featured a wooden figure representing Himba, the goddess of fertility

She is the emblem of the Central Bank.


Nowadays Guinea uses only banknotes.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.