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Coinage of Tanzania

Started by <k>, December 14, 2021, 08:53:51 PM

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<k>





From 1988 to 1990, a nickel clad steel version of the 50 senti coin was issued.

It replaced the old copper-nickel version but was of the same size.

The portrait of the new president now appeared on the obverse of the new coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#31







In 1990 Tanzania issued a new circulating denomination.

It was a 20 shilingi coin made of nickel-plated steel.

The coin was also issued in 1991 and 1992.


The new coin was heptagonal.

It weighed 13 g and had a diameter of 32 mm.


The reverse design featured a mother elephant and her calf.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#32
Tanzania 100 shilingi 1986.jpg


The beautiful elephant design was taken from a Tanzanian collector coin of 1986.

The 100 shilingi coin was part of an international World Wildlife Fund collector series.

Unfortunately, I do nor know which artist created this fine design.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>





In 1991 Tanzania issued a one-year commemorative circulating 25 shilingi coin.

It commemorated the 25th anniversary of the Central Bank.

The coin was made of nickel-plated steel.

It weighed 13 g and had a diameter of 31 mm.





Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#34
Tanzania 100 shilingi 1994-.jpg


In 1993 Tanzania issued a new circulating denomination.

The coin was issued through to 2015.


It was a 100 shilingi coin made of brass-plated steel.

It weighed 9 g and had a diameter of 24.5 mm.


The reverse design featured four impalas (Aepyceros melampus).
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#35
Tanzania 100 shilingi 1994.jpg

A closer look at the beautiful reverse design.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#36
Tanzania 50s 2015-.jpg


In 1996 Tanzania issued another new circulating denomination.

The 50 shilingi coin bridged the gap between the 20 and 100 shilingi coins.


It was heptagonal and made of brass-plated steel.

It weighed 9 g and had a diameter of 24.5 mm.

Below you see the obverse of the coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#37
Tanzania 50s 2015.jpg


The reverse design featured a mother rhinoceros and her calf.

The coin was issued through to 2015.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#38
Tanzania 50s.jpg

Another image of this beautiful design. Notice the bird on the rhino's back.


Peter Dijkhuis, the son-in-law of the late Christopher Ironside, emailed me: "The Tanzania impala and rhinoceros designs are definitely by Christopher Ironside. Christopher had a great friendship with John Betjeman, who was given the original sketch designs by Christopher."

However, Peter adds: "As Christopher never wrote down his full portfolio, sometimes I have had to err on the side of caution regarding the coins." Therefore Peter has not attributed the designs to Mr. Ironside in his book about his late father-in-law.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Sheikh Abeid Amani Karume (1905 – 1972), was the first President of Zanzibar. He obtained this title as a result of a popular revolution which led to the deposing of the last Sultan in Zanzibar in January 1964. Three months later, the United Republic of Tanzania was founded as Tanzania, prompting Karume to become the first Vice President of the United Republic along with Julius Nyerere of Tanganyika as president. He was the father of Zanzibar's former president – Amani Abeid Karume.

Karume was assassinated in April 1972 in Zanzibar Town. Amani Abeid Karume, Sheikh Abeid's son, was twice elected president of Zanzibar, in 2000 and 2005 by a popular majority and handed over power in late 2010 to his successor Ali Mohamed Shein.

See Wikipedia: Abeid Karume.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#40
Tanzania 200 shilingi 1998.jpg


In 1998 Tanzania issued another new circulating denomination.

The 200 shilingi coin was made of nickel-brass.


It weighed 8 g and had a diameter of 26.9 mm.

The obverse of the coin portrays Sheikh Abeid Amani Karume.

He was first president of independent Zanzibar, from 1964 to 1972.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#41


The reverse of the coin featured two lions. Are they father and cub or lion and lioness?

The designs were the work of the Royal Canadian Mint.

The RCM does not reveal the designer names of their overseas coins.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#42
Tanzania 500 shilingi 2014.jpg


In 2014 Tanzania issued another new circulating denomination.

The 500 shilingi coin was made of nickel-plated steel.

It weighed 9.5 g and had a diameter of 27.5 mm.


The obverse of the coin portrays Sheikh Abeid Amani Karume.

The portrait is slightly different from the previous one.

His hairline is slightly different.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The reverse of the coin featured an African buffalo  (Syncerus caffer).

The design was the work of English artist Jody Clark.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#44




Eritrea 100c 1997.jpg


Percy Metcalfe's famous Irish series of 1928 showed a hen and chicks on the penny and a pig and piglets on the halfpenny.

Another animal mother and child design was not issued until 1964: the elephant and calf on the Malawi florin.

The similar Tanzanian design was of higher quality, in my opinion.

Eritrea did a later one in 1997, but it wasn't great.


See also:

Animal mother and child

Elephants on coins
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.