Coinage of Tanzania

Started by <k>, December 14, 2021, 08:53:51 PM

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<k>



Map of East Africa




Map of Tanzania


From Wikipedia:

Following their respective independence from the UK in 1961 and 1963, Tanganyika and Zanzibar merged in 1964 to form the United Republic of Tanzania. The countries had joined the British Commonwealth in 1961, and Tanzania is still a member of the Commonwealth as one republic.

Before World War I, Tanganyika formed part of the German colony of German East Africa. It was gradually occupied by forces from the British Empire and Belgian Congo during the East Africa Campaign, although German resistance continued until 1918. After this, the League of Nations formalised the UK's control of the area, who renamed it "Tanganyika", while Ruanda-Urundi (present-day Rwanda and Burundi) was assigned to Belgium. The UK held Tanganyika as a League of Nations mandate until the end of World War II after which it was held as a United Nations trust territory. In 1961, Tanganyika gained its independence from the UK as Tanganyika.

On 10 December 1963, the Protectorate that had existed over Zanzibar since 1890 was terminated by the United Kingdom. The United Kingdom did not grant Zanzibar independence because the UK never had sovereignty over Zanzibar. Rather, by the Zanzibar Act 1963 of the United Kingdom, the UK ended the Protectorate and made provision for full-self government in Zanzibar as an independent country within the Commonwealth. Upon the Protectorate being abolished, Zanzibar became a constitutional monarchy within the Commonwealth under the Sultan. Sultan Jamshid bin Abdullah was overthrown a month later during the Zanzibar Revolution. His mainly Arab government by local African revolutionaries. Jamshid fled into exile, and the Sultanate was replaced by the People's Republic of Zanzibar. In April 1964, the existence of this socialist republic was ended when it united with Tanganyika to form the United Republic of Tanganyika and Zanzibar, which became known as Tanzania six months later.

Tanzania has a population of around 61 million. Its capital is Dodoma. Christianity is the largest religion in Tanzania, but there are also substantial Muslim and Animist minorities. Over 100 different languages are spoken in Tanzania. The country does not have a de jure official language, although the national language is Swahili. English is used in foreign trade, in diplomacy, in higher courts, and as a medium of instruction in secondary and higher education. Although the Tanzanian government is planning to discontinue English as the primary language of instruction, it will be available as an optional course. Approximately 10 per cent of Tanzanians speak Swahili as a first language, and up to 90 per cent speak it as a second language. In 2020, the World Bank declared the rise of the Tanzanian economy from low income to lower middle income country.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#1


The flag of Tanzania was adopted in 1964 to replace the individual flags of Tanganyika and Zanzibar. It has been the flag of the United Republic of Tanzania since the two states merged that year. The design of the present flag incorporates elements of the two former flags.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#2


From Wikipedia:

The coat of arms of Tanzania comprises a warrior's shield, which bears a golden portion on the upper part, followed underneath by the flag of Tanzania.

The golden portion represents minerals in the United Republic; the red portion underneath the flag symbolises the rich fertile soil of Africa; and the wavy bands represent the land, sea, lakes and coastal lines of the United Republic.

In the golden part of the flag, there appears a burning torch signifying freedom (Uhuru), enlightenment and knowledge; a spear signifying defence of freedom and crossed axe and hoe being tools that the people of Tanzania use in developing the country.

The shield stands upon the representation of Mount Kilimanjaro. Elephant tusks are supported by a man and a woman, with a clove bush at the feet of the man and a cotton bush at the feet of the woman (whose head is covered with a golden scarf) indicating the theme of co-operation.

The United Republic motto, "Uhuru na Umoja", is written in Swahili and means "Freedom and Unity".
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

The shilingi  is the currency of Tanzania. It is subdivided into 100 senti. The Tanzanian shilingi replaced the East African shilling on 14 June 1966 at par.

In 1966, coins were introduced in denominations of 5, 20 and 50 senti and 1 shilingi, with the 5 senti struck in bronze, the 20 senti in nickel-brass (copper-nickel-zinc) and the 50 senti and 1 shillingi in copper-nickel.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#4


Julius Nyerere in 1960.


Julius Kambarage Nyerere (1922 – 1999) served as the first President of Tanzania and prior to that of Tanganyika, from the country's founding in 1961 until his retirement in 1985. In 1961 Tanganyika was granted self governance and Nyerere became its first Prime Minister on 9 December 1961. A year later he was elected President of Tanganyika when it became a republic. He was instrumental in the union between the islands of Zanzibar and the mainland Tanganyika to form Tanzania, after the Zanzibar revolution on 12 January 1964 which toppled the Sultan of Zanzibar Jamshid bin Abdullah. The coup leader, a stonemason from Lira, Uganda, named John Okello, had intended Zanzibar to join Kenya. Nyerere, unnerved by the Tanganyika Army mutiny a few days later, ensured that Okello was barred from returning to Zanzibar after a visit to the mainland.

From the mid 1970s on he was one of the leaders of the Front Line States which campaigned in support of black majority rule in southern Africa. In 1978 he led Tanzania in war with Uganda, defeating and exiling the government of Idi Amin. Nyerere was instrumental in the 1977 coup in Seychelles which brought France-Albert René to power.

Nyerere died in a London hospital of leukaemia on 14 October 1999.

See Wikipedia: Julius Nyerere.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#5
Tanzania 5 senti 1976.jpg


The 5 senti was the lowest denomination of Tanzania's first coinage.

It was bronze and 12-sided.  It weighed 4 g and had a diameter of 23.24 mm.

The common obverse of the coinage featured a portrait of President Nyerere.


All the coins were produced by the Royal Mint.

Their obverse and reverse designs were created and modelled by Christopher Ironside.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#6
Tanzania 5 senti 1976-.jpg


The reverse of the 5 senti coin featured the Indo-Pacific sailfish (Istiophorus platypterus).
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#7
Sailfish.jpg

An Indo-Pacific sailfish.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#8
Tanzania 20 senti 1981.jpg


Until 1977, the 20 senti was the next highest denomination in the series.

It was made of nickel-brass. It weighed 5 g and had a diameter of 24 mm.

The obverse of the 20 senti coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#9
Tanzania 20 senti 1966.jpg

The reverse of the 20 senti coin featured an ostrich.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#10
Tanzania 50 senti-.jpg


The 50 senti coin was made of copper-nickel.

It weighed 4 g and had a diameter of 21 mm.

The obverse of the 50 senti coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#11
Tanzania 50 senti~.jpg

The reverse of the 50 senti coin featured a rabbit.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#12
Tanzania 1s 1966.jpg


The 1 shilingi coin was the highest denomination of the series at this point.

It was was made of copper-nickel.

It weighed 8 g and had a diameter of    27.74 mm.

The obverse featured President Nyerere, as seen on the 50 senti coin.

The reverse of the design featured the Uhuru torch.


The Uhuru Torch (Swahili: Mwenge wa Uhuru, literally "Torch of Freedom") is one of the National Symbols of Tanzania.

It is a kerosene torch. It symbolises freedom and light.

It was first lit on top of Mount Kilimanjaro on December 9, 1961 by Alexander Donald Gwebe-Nyirenda.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#13


More details about the common obverse of the coinage.

RAIS WA KWANZA means "First President" in the Swahili language.

Nyerere was of course the first president of Tanzania.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#14


Cloves are the aromatic flower buds of a tree in the family Myrtaceae, Syzygium aromaticum.

They are native to the Maluku Islands in Indonesia and are commonly used as a spice.

Some species exist in Africa.

Syzygium aromaticum is also regarded as the national flower of Tanzania.

The sprigs that flank the portrait of the president on the obverse of the coinage are of Syzygium aromaticum.


See: Sprig varieties on Tanzanian obverses.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.