Author Topic: Irish World War 2 banknote issues  (Read 385 times)

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Offline Elak

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Re: Irish World War 2 banknote issues
« Reply #15 on: December 03, 2021, 01:14:04 AM »
Irish notes were generally back-dated when being printed. I would need to look up the Central Bank records to know when the 4.9.43 note was printed (I will do that and post it).

I think that submarine activity in the Irish Sea was less of a worry than air attack, especially when consignments were still being printed in England.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Irish World War 2 banknote issues
« Reply #16 on: December 04, 2021, 04:17:08 PM »
If you mean a nazi air attack in the Irish sea, that's improbable. Their bombers could have made it, but not the fighters, so the bombers would have been easy prey and the target wasn't worth it.

If you mean an air attack on De la Rue, the company's factories and offices at Bunhill Row were destroyed in 1940. Not sure where its printing plant was afterwards, except that it was in Scotland, beyond the action radius of fighters (Scapa Flow's single air attack was made by four bombers) until they moved to Walthamstow in 1946.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Elak

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Re: Irish World War 2 banknote issues
« Reply #17 on: December 09, 2021, 08:28:03 PM »
The German air force bombed Dublin a couple of times during the war - accidentally, of course(!) - and bombed Belfast more often.
The threat of hostile air activity over the Irish sea was quite a real one those days.

Banknotes being transported by train in England to the ferry port would also have been open to the possibility of being bombed.

Offline Elak

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Re: Irish World War 2 banknote issues
« Reply #18 on: January 17, 2022, 10:34:49 PM »
Irish notes were generally back-dated when being printed. I would need to look up the Central Bank records to know when the 4.9.43 note was printed (I will do that and post it).

The 10 Shilling note dated 4.9.43 was part of an order finalised in a meeting of the Board of the Central Bank of Ireland held on 25 July 1944. This note was pre-dated by almost a year when it was printed. An interesting print order, it created several rarities!