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Blue nose

Started by quaziright, October 23, 2021, 03:28:59 AM

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quaziright

Lovely little coins released today

Gusev

For some reason I can't see the photo
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.


Gusev

Thank you, now everything is fine
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Gusev

Why "Blue Nose"?
I have not found an acceptable explanation.
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Figleaf

There is an explanation here. In a few words, Bluenose is a traditional nickname for the inhabitants of Nova Scotia, whose noses were presumably in permafrost. Canada boasts the second coldest capital in the world, though Ottawa is South of NS.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Gusev

Yes, I read that before.
But these are only assumptions.
At first I thought that this expression speaks of an addiction to alcohol.
But this is a national feature of the inhabitants of other countries. :)
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Figleaf

It is more than an assumption, Gusev. follow the link for extensive evidence.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Gusev

Quote from: Figleaf on October 24, 2021, 12:54:18 PM
.......... follow the link for extensive evidence.
Peter

This is a quote from your link

".........In the end, who knows what the word really means, or where it comes from...!........."

"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

<k>

In English you can be blue with cold, or feeling blue (sad), also "I've got the blues!" (I'm sad). It's not usually associated with being drunk.

If a German says, "Man, he was BLUE last night!", the typical English translation would be he was "blind drunk". Or sometimes "smashed!". In my birth city of Newcastle, we sometimes say, "He was PALLATIC!", meaning "paralytic."
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Gusev


I agree, there are national peculiarities of the language and it is difficult to translate.
In the USSR, a drunkard was referred to as a "bruise" (meaning a blue nose).

After a good party with friends in my student years (about 0.5 liters, 40 degrees each), we can say - "Well received on the chest."
If you get very drunk - "Drunk as a lord." :)
There is no suitable explanation for this expression.
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offa

There is a coloured one as well they look superb.
All coins are equal but some are more equal than others

redlock

...if only the 10c coin were a bit larger. It's just such a tiny thing.

Offa

Bluenose is the name of the ship, a Canadian racing yacht
All coins are equal but some are more equal than others