Author Topic: Thailand: architecture on circulation coins since the 1980s  (Read 689 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Thailand: architecture on circulation coins since the 1980s
« Reply #15 on: August 25, 2021, 05:11:23 PM »
5 baht.  Copper-nickel clad copper.  2531-2551 (1988-2008).

Wat Benchamabophit, also known as The Marble Temple.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Thailand: architecture on circulation coins since the 1980s
« Reply #16 on: August 25, 2021, 05:12:00 PM »
A closer look at the reverse of the 5 baht coin.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Thailand: architecture on circulation coins since the 1980s
« Reply #17 on: August 25, 2021, 05:12:47 PM »
Wat Benchamabophit.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Thailand: architecture on circulation coins since the 1980s
« Reply #18 on: August 25, 2021, 05:19:56 PM »
10 baht.   Bimetallic: aluminium-bronze centre within a copper-nickel ring.   2531-2551 (1988-2008).

Arun Temple (Temple of the Dawn), Bangkok.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Thailand: architecture on circulation coins since the 1980s
« Reply #19 on: August 25, 2021, 05:20:45 PM »
A closer look at the reverse of the 10 baht coin.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Thailand: architecture on circulation coins since the 1980s
« Reply #20 on: August 25, 2021, 05:21:37 PM »
Temple of the Dawn.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Thailand: architecture on circulation coins since the 1980s
« Reply #21 on: August 25, 2021, 10:10:46 PM »
In 2005 Thailand added a new denomination of 2 baht to its circulation series.

The coin was made of nickel-plated steel. This type was issued in 2005, 2006 and 2007 only (Buddhist years 2548-2550).


The coin carried a new more mature portrait of the king on the obverse.

The reverse featured the Phukhao Thong of Saket Temple in Bangkok.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Thailand: architecture on circulation coins since the 1980s
« Reply #22 on: August 25, 2021, 10:12:02 PM »
Wat Saket.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Thailand: architecture on circulation coins since the 1980s
« Reply #23 on: August 25, 2021, 10:33:40 PM »
In 2008 Thailand issued an aluminium-bronze version of the 2 baht coin.

It was issued through to 2017.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Thailand: architecture on circulation coins since the 1980s
« Reply #24 on: August 25, 2021, 10:43:44 PM »
In 2008 a whole new series was issued, with the more mature portrait of the King on the obverse.

The 25 satang coin was now the lowest denomination and was now made of copper-plated steel, instead of aluminium-bronze.

The 25 satang coin was now also made of copper-plated steel, instead of aluminium-bronze.

The 1 baht coin was now made of nickel-plated steel, instead of copper-nickel.

As shown above, the 1 baht coin was now made of aluminium-bronze, instead of nickel-plated steel.

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Offline <k>

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Re: Thailand: architecture on circulation coins since the 1980s
« Reply #25 on: August 25, 2021, 10:48:32 PM »
King Rama IX died in 2016. Coins with his portrait were last issued in 2017.

The coins of the new king were first issued in 2018. The new design series does not depict buildings.



See also: East Asian architecture on coins.

 
« Last Edit: August 26, 2021, 07:51:46 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Thailand: architecture on circulation coins since the 1980s
« Reply #26 on: August 26, 2021, 12:24:32 PM »
According to Numista, the aluminium 1 and 5 satang coins of 1987 to 2007 are non-circulating coins. Is that correct?
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Offline Pabitra

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Re: Thailand: architecture on circulation coins since the 1980s
« Reply #27 on: August 26, 2021, 04:45:06 PM »
Does anybody have a link to a nice image that captures the river scene above, on the 5 baht coin?
Will this suffice, without the Grand Palace in background?

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Thailand: architecture on circulation coins since the 1980s
« Reply #28 on: August 26, 2021, 04:48:27 PM »
According to Numista, the aluminium 1 and 5 satang coins of 1987 to 2007 are non-circulating coins. Is that correct?
New King coin set also has these denominations. They were never issued in circulation but these statutory requirement led to 9 coins set.

Offline <k>

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Re: Thailand: architecture on circulation coins since the 1980s
« Reply #29 on: August 26, 2021, 05:47:20 PM »
Will this suffice, without the Grand Palace in background?

Thank you, Pabitra. Excellent image. I've linked to it in my post upthread.

And thank you for the info on the non-circulation low denominations coins.
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