Coin designs that don't quite work

Started by <k>, August 08, 2021, 03:55:32 AM

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<k>

Coin designs that don't quite work. That is a highly subjective statement, of course. A design that works for one person may not work for somebody else.

However, please post any designs that don't work for YOU, and explain why.  :)
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<k>

#1


Dominican Republic, half peso, 1990.  The Columbus Lighthouse..









A brave attempt to capture this huge monument on a coin design.

However, there is too much blank space left on the coin. Some background should ideally have been added, but the perspective doesn't really allow it.

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<k>

#2


Ireland, 6 pence.  Percy Metcalfe's famous design of an Irish wolfhound.

But would you ever really have guessed that it is meant to represent that breed of dog?


Irish wolfhound.jpg

The real dog has longish hair.
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<k>

#3


Djibouti, 100 francs.


Sadly, the camel in front looks as if its legs are mere stumps.

Artist Raymond Joly lacked the technical ability to make this design work.
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<k>

#4
Colombia $1000 1996-.jpg


Colombia $1000 1996.jpg


Colombia, 100 pesos, 1996.  Standard circulation coin.

Is your glass half empty, or half full?
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Figleaf

This is a double cash, era shao-xing (1131-1162), variant with seal script, Remmelts 108.

Observe the horizontal characters. What's left of my brain insists there's a fat Chinese with a black eye on the left and an angel, singing its innocence on the right. I have never seen a really good specimen, so I added a catalogue drawing to guide your eye.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

<k>

#6
Spain 25c 1925.jpg

Spain, 25 centimos, 1925. 


Is this design good or bad? I can't make my mind up. Is it cleverly portraying the chaos of a storm?  Maybe the storm also has a symbolic meaning? The coin shows a galleon in full sail. The galleon was a typically Spanish warship that was used since the early 16th century.
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<k>

#7


South Africa, 5 shillings. 50th Anniversary of the Union of South Africa. The reverse features the South African parliament building.


Even though this is a large coin, the building is too wide and cannot be depicted at an adequate size on the coin.

A lot of blank space is therefore left, which is not easy to fill.

 
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<k>

#8
Oman 1 rial 2014.jpg

Oman, 1 rial, 2014.  44th National Day.  The Oman council building.


Here the building is again too wide to be depicted adequately. It spills out awkwardly towards the edge of the coin.

The blank space is this time filled in with the foreground to the building. This is a better solution than blank space but still not ideal.

Moral: do not depict wide buildings on coins.
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<k>

#9
Tonga 1 pa'anga 1981.jpg

Tonga, 1 pa'anga, 1981.


This design works well. My point here is to emphasise that the rectangular shape would work well for wide buildings.

A rectangular coin can only be used for collector coins, of course.
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<k>

#10


New Zealand, $2.




Canada, $1, 1967.  Canada goose.  100th anniversary of the Confederation of Canada.


Large birds also do not work well on coins. They leave too much blank space.

Solutions to this problem do exist, however.  See: How to portray tall thin birds on coins.
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chrisild

Quote from: <k> on August 12, 2021, 04:08:13 PM
Spain, 25 centimos, 1925. 

Is this design good or bad?

A little too busy maybe. I like the idea of taking parts of the design to the very edge though. Interestingly, roughly the same ship design was used by their Portuguese neighbors a little later, on the 2.5, 5 and 10 escudo coins. But those designs were "less windy". :)

Yes, the goose on that Canadian coin has lots of air around it. At least it matches the other designs of that one year (Confederation Centennial) series, see the 10 cents for example.

Christian

<k>

#12
Quote from: chrisild on September 23, 2021, 03:42:12 PMA little too busy maybe. I like the idea of taking parts of the design to the very edge though. Interestingly, roughly the same ship design was used by their Portuguese neighbors a little later, on the 2.5, 5 and 10 escudo coins. But those designs were "less windy". :)



Do you mean this Portuguese design?

Nothing wrong with this design, I think. Though the font is rather large.
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<k>

Quote from: chrisild on September 23, 2021, 03:42:12 PM
Yes, the goose on that Canadian coin has lots of air around it. At least it matches the other designs of that one year (Confederation Centennial) series, see the 10 cents for example.



Yes, quite "airy" - though the design strikes me as fine, in this case, perhaps because it is more centrally placed.
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chrisild

Quote from: <k> on September 23, 2021, 03:56:50 PM
Do you mean this Portuguese design?

Yes, that one or this one. And no, they are fine; I just found it interesting that the "quite possibly too busy" Spanish coin was soon replaced by other designs while the Portuguese picked the theme up and then used it for many years.

As for the Canadian pieces, I assume (not sure though) that the designs were allowed to be "airy" because this series was supposed to be a one-year thing. The later "loonie" for example does have some background elements.

One design that "does not really work" in my opinion was this 10 fr coin from Luxembourg (smaller image/embedded link below). If you have lots of space, and decide to not have many design elements on that side, why "squeeze" the figures this way?  ;D

Christian