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Naive designs on coins

Started by <k>, July 12, 2021, 03:34:37 PM

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<k>

The naive style in art is a deliberately simplistic or childlike style.
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<k>



Portugal, 5 euro, 2021.  Seahorse.
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<k>








Argentina 2017-2018.



It is highly unusual to see such a style on an entire circulation coin series.

See: Argentina: trees and flowers set issued in 2017 and 2018.
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<k>



Canada, 25 cents, 1999.



Some designs look as though they were produced by children, although they were deliberately produced by adults to look that way.
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<k>



Australia has also been guilty of this style.  50 cents, 1994.  Year of the Family.


See also: Stick men, stick beasts, and faceless people.
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<k>

#5









Coins from the Netherlands.

Some countries produce simplistic portraits of their monarchs and other statesmen.

See also: Stylised portraits.
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chrisild

That last image should be rotated 90° clockwise. Also from NL there is the Laatste Gulden (Last Guilder) coin; guess we already have an image of that here. Malta (€2) and Austria (€10 Austrian States series) issued "child designs" as well ...

<k>



Cuba, 1 centavo, 1988.  INTUR - visitors coinage.


This deer is just an outline. There is even a gap in its back.
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<k>

#8
Iraq 1979.jpg


Iraq, 1979.  Year of the Child.

"Oh, no - I'm going two-dimensional !"
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bart

Here's the last guilder coin

Figleaf

It would be good to distinguish:

  • Naive art: a deliberately simplistic style, often missing perspective, but rich in detail.
  • Abstract art: a non-photographic, symbolic or incomplete rendering of reality, often missing perspective and with little detail.
  • Children's drawings. Children draw in accordance with their capacities, which are still developing. That doesn't exclude that what they make is artful, but if it is simplistic, it is not deliberately so.

Note that coin designs created from a photo with a computer are none of the above (many are not even realistic), while portraits heavily worked with a computer are in principle abstractions.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

<k>

See also: Designs by children.

The term 'children' here includes all young persons under the age of 18.
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<k>



Colombia, 100 pesos, 2012.

A rather simplistic and two-dimensional portrayal of the espeletia shrub, commonly known as a frailejón.
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Siberian Man

Egypt.

<k>

What are the year and denomination of the Egyptian coin? You should always include those.
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