Uncertainty over whether Charles will be depicted on Canadian coinage

Started by eurocoin, July 08, 2021, 06:09:21 PM

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eurocoin

Internal documents of the Royal Canadian Mint that were recently provided to me show that there is uncertainty over whether then King Charles will ever be depicted on the obverse of the Canadian coinage. The nearly 400 pages provide a very detailed plan for everything that needs to happen when there will be a new monarch. The Royal Canadian Mint first started preparing for a change of monarch in early 2017. Initially for a long time there was assumed that it was a new effigy they needed to prepare for but following conversations between the Royal Canadian Mint and the Government of Canada on the subject, of which Buckingham Palace was also informed, the option that no new portrait was going to be introduced at all was explicitly added.

The documents also show that the Royal Canadian Mint maintains close contact on the subject with the Perth Mint and the Royal Mint. The Royal Australian Mint was, somewhat remarkably, not named.

<k>

Commonwealth realms are not obliged to use the royal portrait on their coins, though it has long been traditional to do so in Canada. Charles is not viewed with the same confidence as the current Queen by many. Already there is talk of ditching the monarchy in various Commonwealth realms. Monarchy is after all a vestige of medieval times. Why should we need it nowadays? Maybe it will go the way of mangles and crank handles. Perhaps this is a sign that Canada is also thinking of transitioning to a republic.
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quaziright

The rumours have been going around for years that the cost of arms of Canada will replace the portrait as soon as the queen dies. I've said as much quite a few times on the forum. The republic however is a long ways away. Even if there were a referendum held, it would attract very few people to the polls

<k>

Quote from: quaziright on July 08, 2021, 08:34:28 PM
The republic however is a long ways away. Even if there were a referendum held, it would attract very few people to the polls

I wouldn't rule it out. We live in times of such change that attempting to predict the future is foolhardy.
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eurocoin

I am aware that there have been rumours and speculation, but I found it nevertheless interesting to find official documents about it. I am not sure about the possibility of it becoming a republic either but based on the documents it seems that the Canadian government has a clear preference for no Charles on the coinage. And the most likely alternative is indeed the coat of arms.

redlock

Quote from: eurocoin on July 08, 2021, 06:09:21 PM
whether then King Charles will ever be depicted on the obverse of the Canadian coinage.

Well, you should probably say ''circulation coinage.'' I am certain the Royal Canadian Mint will use the occasion to mint as many NCLT coins featuring the new king as possible.  ;)

chrisild

About a month ago, the CBC news site had an article about what might come, in terms of notes and coins, now that Charles is the new head of state. Apparently it is quite likely that he will be depicted on Canadian coins.

Will be interesting to see how the "portrait side" will change then. Currently, all circulation coins say ELIZABETH II on the left and D · G · REGINA on the right, with the royal effigy in the center and dividing the two text parts. Now with CHARLES III and D · G · REX, assuming that he will be head of state "by the grace of God", that balance does not work that well ...

<k>

Quote from: chrisild on October 09, 2022, 01:08:21 PMCurrently, all circulation coins say ELIZABETH II on the left and D · G · REGINA on the right, with the royal effigy in the center and dividing the two text parts.

All the standard circulation coins do, but not all the commemorative circulation coins.
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<k>

When I was in Germany in the 1980s, if the Germans talked about the Queen of Denmark, they would say, "Die Königin von Dänemark" in their own language. When they talked about QEII, however, they would use the English word and simply say, "Die Queen" - pronounced German-style, as "dee Kveen". :D  This surprised me. However, QEII was often in the news, as Queen of several countries and as Head of the Commonwealth.

Do you think the Germans will ever refer to Charles as "Der King"?
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chrisild

We'll see what people come up with. Yes, "die Queen" was or is quite common around here. Maybe because the other monarchies do not make it to the news that excessively. ;) Oh, and thank you for providing the pronunciation - some English speakers may have wondered about the "Die" imperative ...

The name, however, is usually pronounced the German way, as if it was spelled Elisabeth. And that is something that is different now: Nobody says "Karl", it's Charles of course. King Charles? König Charles? Who knows. But a mere "Der King" I cannot imagine.

(Besides, "Der King" lived, or had a residence, in Germany between late 1958 and early 1960. ;D )

eurocoin

In an opinion poll held by Canadian public opinion and marketing research firm Pollara shortly after the Queen died, 56% of the people were against the introduction of a portrait of King Charles III on the Canadian coins and banknotes.

GCVO

The government has confirmed that Charles III will appear on Canadian coins (in a few months) and the $20 bill (at its next redesign in a few years).

quaziright

https://www.mint.ca/en/discover/faces-of-the-monarch/king-charles-effigy

The process to create a new design for the effigy of His Majesty King Charles III is complex and involves many steps:
Following the Government of Canada's announcement, an email invitation will be sent to more than 350 artists in our database as well as to our Mint engravers.
Each artist and engraver who responds with a notice of interest and a required portfolio of portrait work will be evaluated. Each shortlisted artist and engraver will receive an artist brief outlining mandatory design requirements.
Design concepts will be evaluated by an internal Mint review panel that will judge submissions based on aesthetics, technical requirements and mass-production suitability.
The winning design will be submitted for necessary government and Buckingham Palace approvals.
The Mint will then begin the engraving and tooling process where dies are created to strike the coins.
Production, or striking, of new circulation coins will begin.
Striking of the new effigy on numismatic and bullion coins will follow.

Facts about the new effigy
What will the effigy look like?

In keeping with long-standing tradition, His Majesty King Charles III's profile will face left. This is the opposite direction in which the portrait of Queen Elizabeth II was depicted. The initials of the winning artist will also appear on the obverse.

Why didn't we use the British effigy since it is already finished and approved?
Canadian coins have featured a royal effigy designed by Canadian artists since 1990 (Dora de Pédery-Hunt from 1990-2002 and Susanna Blunt from 2003 to the present). It is important that we continue to showcase the talent of Canadian artists on coins that will circulate by the millions across Canada for many years.

When will we see the new effigy?

We hope to be in a position to show Canadians the new effigy design in the fall, once the design process had been completed and the necessary approvals obtained.

When will I find one in my change?
We cannot provide an exact timeline as of yet but details will be shared when the new effigy is unveiled.

Why is The King going on our coins?

The decision on the permanent obverse lies exclusively with the Government of Canada. As Canada's coin manufacturer, we will apply our considerable skill and expertise producing royal effigies on Canadian coins to the important and historic task the Government has assigned us.

Will coins bearing the image of The Late Queen need to be taken out of circulation/replaced with coins featuring The King?
All coins currently in circulation remain legal tender, regardless of the fact that our monarch has changed. As coins have a life span of over 20 years, Canadians can expect to see "Queen" coins in circulation for many more years.

Offa

They could follow the same path as Australia, the sovereigns head on coins and native designs on bank notes instead of the sovereign
All coins are equal but some are more equal than others