Guernsey: golden jubilee collector coins with four variations

Started by <k>, June 22, 2021, 12:51:29 AM

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<k>

Guernsey 5 pounds 2002-silver.jpg

Guernsey, 5 pounds, 2002.   Silver.
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In 2002 Guernsey issued a copper-nickel 5 pound collector coin.

It commemorated the Queen's golden jubilee.


Above you see another version of the coin, with the same obverse and reverse designs.

Here, however, it is made of silver and has a gold-plated cameo on the obverse.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Guernsey 5 pounds 2002-gold.jpg

Guernsey, 5 pounds, 2002.   Gold.



Guernsey, 5 pounds, 2002-gilt.jpg

Guernsey, 5 pounds, 2002.   Gilt.


Another version was made of gold-plated copper-nickel.

The coin actually includes the world 'GILT' on the reverse.

Gilt means gold-plated.


Additionally, a fourth version of the coin came in gold.

All the coins were of the same size.

Only the size of the images is different.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

I wonder if there are any other examples of coins with the word 'GILT' on them? Or maybe 'GOLD-PLATED'.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Guernsey 25 pounds 2002-gold.jpg

Guernsey, 25 pounds, 2002.  Gold.


Surprisingly, the same design was also issued in that same year (2002). This time it was on a 25 pounds gold coin, with a diameter of 22 mm.

This policy of issuing the same coin in different metals and different denominations seems to mimic the Britannia gold and silver bullion coin series. However, those particular 'Britannia' designs are NEVER minted in copper-nickel. In the UK, the theme of Britannia remains the same, though with different designs of Britannia over the years. However, Guernsey has changed the commemorative theme of these multi-denomination/metal coins every(?) year since 1995.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Figleaf

How do you know that the gilding was done in the UK mint?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

<k>

I checked Gerhard's catalogue. Unlike the Isle of Man and Gibraltar, Alderney, Jersey and Guernsey have always had their coins produced by the Royal Mint in modern times.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Figleaf

My question was more the positive form of "how do you know the gilding wasn't done outside the mint".

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

<k>

Trust me, the version marked 'GILT' is an official issue and most definitely not an IRA countermark.  ::)
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Big_M

Clearly the word GILT is raised, hence it must have been done at the mint. Were it incuse, you might have had some doubts.

Figleaf

That was indeed the point. Photos can easily deceive.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.