Author Topic: Vatican €5 (2005): Sede Vacante  (Read 231 times)

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Offline Bimat

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Vatican €5 (2005): Sede Vacante
« on: January 18, 2021, 04:11:19 PM »
Added this coin to my collection today. The coin was in my wish list for quite some and it finally made it to my coin cabinet today! UFN had issued a complete set of 8 regular euro coins (1c - €2) with the same theme which is beyond my budget now, so had to get the silver version which is much cheaper than the BU set. There is a gold €10 version as well, but I have no plans to get that one. ;)

€5 (2005): Sede Vacante, Ag 925/1000, 18.0g, 32.00mm, Mintage: 13,440 (Proof Only.)

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Bimat

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Vatican €5 (2005): Sede Vacante
« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2021, 04:14:55 PM »
By the way, I do have the 2013 €2 Sede Vacante commemorative from Vatican, both in BU coin card and the Phila-Numismatic Cover. I also have couple of Sede Vacante issues from the Pre-Euro era, so this coin is a very welcome new addition indeed! :)



Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Vatican €5 (2005): Sede Vacante
« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2021, 07:33:23 PM »
That 2005 silver coin I like, mostly because of the way the dove is designed. But the combination of the round coin shape, and the square, is nice too: The bird stays within that square, except for that little bit at the top. Good one! (And yes, that Sede Vacante set is expensive ... Should not have been issued anyway, but back then the law was not as explicit as it is now. ;) )

Christian

Offline Bimat

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Re: Vatican €5 (2005): Sede Vacante
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2021, 07:30:39 AM »
That 2005 silver coin I like, mostly because of the way the dove is designed. But the combination of the round coin shape, and the square, is nice too: The bird stays within that square, except for that little bit at the top. Good one!

Looks like Vatican does it that way quite frequently. Here is a L500 coin I have which also has a square inside the round coin. I remember seeing similar pattern on few other Vatican coins, may be San Marino too.



Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Vatican €5 (2005): Sede Vacante
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2021, 10:54:29 AM »
A square inside the circle diminishes the "roundness" of the coin. Its disadvantage is that it makes the design flat. Also, it creates five frames, that can be used for different aspects of the subject of the coin.

Incidentally, the square-in-circle design can quite often be found on Islamic coins. On these coins, the area inside the square is often used for a religious invocation, while the four areas on the side are reserved for technical information, such as mint and date or, if the ruler is mentioned in the square, the side frames are used for religious purposes.

The separation of purpose on these coins as well as on the coins shown above is no coincidence. Just by drawing the square, you define artistic opportunities and challenges. Those are independent of religion.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Bimat

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Vatican €5 (2005): Sede Vacante
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2021, 02:22:49 PM »
Incidentally, the square-in-circle design can quite often be found on Islamic coins. On these coins, the area inside the square is often used for a religious invocation, while the four areas on the side are reserved for technical information, such as mint and date or, if the ruler is mentioned in the square, the side frames are used for religious purposes.

Interesting analogy, certainly didn't think of that! So who inspired whom? I do not remember seeing ancient European coins with similar design concept, so may be Islamic influence had an impact on them in 19th/20th century?

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Vatican €5 (2005): Sede Vacante
« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2021, 10:36:51 PM »
My guess is that Islam came up with the concept. As portraits of living creatures are forbidden, geometry took on added importance in Islamic art. Greek philosophers had a religious interest in squares and other geometric forms, that eventually became alchemy. In alchemy, the square (actually a diamond) stands for soap, so not too attractive for use on coins or in art.

Peter
« Last Edit: January 25, 2021, 11:26:41 AM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Vatican €5 (2005): Sede Vacante
« Reply #7 on: January 25, 2021, 12:27:02 AM »
But let me point at my avatar. Leonardo da Vinci drew the Vitruvian Man roughly in 1490. Granted, the square is not entirely in the circle (as it is a proportions study) but it comes close.  ;D

Christian