Author Topic: Help to identify this jeton  (Read 134 times)

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Offline jsalgado

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Help to identify this jeton
« on: January 13, 2021, 12:24:27 PM »
I need your help is about name in small letters A. N. (...) Ares. Who's that?






Offline Figleaf

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Re: Help to identify this jeton
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2021, 07:38:03 AM »
A. N. may be August Neuss of Augsburg (around 1840 to 1870), engraver and medallist who inherited the workshop of his father, Johann Jakob Neuss. Johann Jakob's work shows French influences, which may explain the "French" font used on this token. August's brother, Johann Jakob Jr., was medallist to the city of Augsburg, later die sinker to the Bavarian court (Hofgraveur).

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline jsalgado

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Re: Help to identify this jeton
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2021, 10:50:44 AM »
Peter Excellent! Many thanks

Offline jsalgado

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Re: Help to identify this jeton
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2021, 03:50:52 PM »
Peter, I would like you to be aware of this information: a friendly collector suggested that it may not be the signature not of August Neuss given that he passed away in 1870 and in his view the jeton is sure is quite later to that date. It is obvious that before the opinion of this my friend I stayed in the doubt on her attribution of the signature, however he does not manifest himself in mentioning which the name of the sculptor.
What do you think?
Thank you for your help.
Jaime
« Last Edit: January 16, 2021, 04:23:30 PM by jsalgado »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Help to identify this jeton
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2021, 05:31:56 PM »
Here is the behind of a French coin. Similar designs were used from the 1790s until 1889 (later on non-circulating coins). It has all the design elements of your jeton: machine struck, bevelled edge, olive wreath and a 5 with a curvy top and a ball below. How can you be sure that the jeton was struck later than 1870?

Still, I never claimed I was sure that it was Neuss. It's just that the details fit and I haven't got a better candidate.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.