Author Topic: Telephone tokens of Germany  (Read 508 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Telephone tokens of Germany
« Reply #15 on: January 14, 2021, 06:38:05 AM »
Strange to counterstamp the test token with BDP, without identifying the Bezirk when there are 14 Bezirksämter. My own preferred solution (based on nothing) was Besitz. Something like: this ain't yours, comrade. However, Bezirk is documented. Thank you for the help, Christian.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Indomini16

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Re: Telephone tokens of Germany
« Reply #16 on: January 15, 2021, 12:17:48 AM »
The article treats two series. The first was issued by Fernmeldetechnischen Zentralamt (FTZ) in Darmstadt (mentioned on the intro page).
So, I guess we have to create a new section "Fernmeldetechnischen Zentralamt" to put the 3 tokens inside.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Telephone tokens of Germany
« Reply #17 on: January 15, 2021, 12:40:40 AM »
German can be tricky. ;D The name of that institution (FTZ) was "Fernmeldetechnisches Zentralamt". But if you use the genitive singular, you get (des) Fernmeldetechnischen Zentralamtes, and so on.

Christian

Offline Indomini16

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Re: Telephone tokens of Germany
« Reply #18 on: January 15, 2021, 01:11:37 AM »
I fully agree, german is different of the languages I know ... Make it difficult :-(
Thanks for the correction!

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Telephone tokens of Germany
« Reply #19 on: January 15, 2021, 07:14:37 AM »
German is easy when compared to Russian. Only four cases in German, six in Russian. Even that is moderate compared to the 8 cases in primal grunting. Multiply that by male, female, neutral and plural and the answer is fear and loathing.

Foreigners can largely ignore cases as they contain little to no information that is not elsewhere in the sentence or can be described simply with a preposition. Just pick the word ending that sounds good to you. If it's the wrong one, the natives will still hear what they expect to hear and may well not even notice your error until you write it down and in that case, the computer increasingly helps you. :)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Telephone tokens of Germany
« Reply #20 on: January 15, 2021, 08:26:04 AM »
German is easy when compared to Russian. Only four cases in German, six in Russian.

"Difficulty" of a non-native language is best defined by its level of difference from the speaker's native tongue. There is nothing inherently "difficult" about case endings per se; Finns manage with far more of them than any Indo-European language, past or present. But if your native language is English, Dutch, French or another language without this feature, it is "difficult".

English has virtually no case endings and few verb endings, but it has one of the most complicated verb structures of the Indo-European family. No other language I know encodes time, aspect and progressiveness/habit simultaneously and to such depth as English does. Russian has a lot of aspectual nuances but only three actual tenses. Romance has a continuous/imperfect aspect but only in the past. The Scandinavian languages use the full range of tenses (same as English) to a greater degree than, say, German, but with no progressive forms, and so on.

Yet those of us who grew up speaking English don't see anything peculiar in this at all  :)

FWIW, when using Russian case endings (and verb endings for person/tense) don't bother me. Perhaps it's because I learned Latin back in the day. But the nuances of all the prefixes you can add to verbs to subtly alter the conditions in which the action is carried out are sometimes baffling. Perfective vs. imperfective is one thing, but the variation is so much more subtle than that.

Offline Indomini16

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Re: Telephone tokens of Germany
« Reply #21 on: January 15, 2021, 09:43:21 PM »
The german section is now updated with the info I have. If someone have pictures or spot an error feel free to correct it :-)
In few days I will upload the missing photo of Munich but for the others pictures a bit of support will be more than welcome.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2021, 07:24:35 PM by Indomini16 »

Offline malj1

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Re: Telephone tokens of Germany
« Reply #22 on: January 15, 2021, 11:14:11 PM »
Thank you.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline Indomini16

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Re: Telephone tokens of Germany
« Reply #23 on: January 17, 2021, 07:54:53 PM »
I am also now waiting for one of Halberstadt :-)

Offline Indomini16

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Re: Telephone tokens of Germany
« Reply #24 on: February 03, 2021, 12:39:10 AM »
Just found this link looking for something else :-)

http://www.numismatik-cafe.at/gallery/album.php?album_id=1084

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Telephone tokens of Germany
« Reply #25 on: February 03, 2021, 08:56:31 AM »
Great find! I believe that Afrasi and perhaps chrisild are members of this forum. They may be able to help you get permission to use these pictures. They would work wonders for the Germany pages.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Telephone tokens of Germany
« Reply #26 on: February 03, 2021, 08:01:20 PM »
Sorry, I am not a member of that forum site ...