Swedish restaurant token

Started by Figleaf, January 04, 2021, 10:11:00 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Figleaf

Brass, 5.0 gram, 25.9 mm, signed Sporrong. It must be Swedish. Sure enough, a 1902 post card places Kneipp in Norrköping and the diameter is compatible with a 22 mm 50 öre piece of those days.

But wait! RESTAURANTEN? Google translate says it oughter've been restaurang (singular) or restauranger (plural).

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

malj1

Your result I feel is too old, my search gave a different result! but this too may be too old? ...but more likely.



Restauranten in the 1890s The restaurant in Djursholm, Sweden, photo från the 1890's



Djursholms restaurant at the railway stop Restauranten. Postcard from ca 1900.

Unknown author - Unknown source

The Restaurant in Djursholm, Sweden. Postcard from year 1900

See more here Restauranten

Restauranten was also a name for a railway stop at Djursholmsbanan on the Djursholms Ösby-Eddavägen line. The stop was next to the restaurant and named for it. It was situated at the street Henrik Palmes allé. In 1968, the railway stop was renamed Djursholms torg.  The railway line was however disbanded in 1976 and replaced by buses
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Figleaf

#2
Can't find the name Kneipp on your pictures, Malcolm, but wouldn't exclude that Kneipp is a restaurant chain, which is why I looked up the word for restaurantS in Swedish. EDIT: a modern German commemorative for a Bavarian priest called Sebastian Kneipp has made it clear to may that there was a health movement named after him. The name is fitting for a spa.

My guess is that the token was used for an "automatic buffet" setup, where you'd "pull food out of a wall". The tokens would make sure they wouldn't have to change the machines every time the government changed coin sizes. That fits with 1902.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

malj1

#3
I was pointing out that the railway station was named Restauranten.

I think both locations are much too early for that particular style of token. I would suggest that particular reverse is much later. Vendind machines were around in 1902 but not for food out of the wall unless you mean a bar of chocolate or a pack of cigarettes.

We do have the various reverses here but unfortunately none are dated.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

FosseWay

Either of your suggestions works time-wise - the high point of the use of these kyparpolletter was late 1880s to WW1.

I would set more store by "Kneipp" than by "Restauranten" as an attribution tool. Figleaf is right that the modern Swedish word for restaurant is restaurang (restaurangen in the definite form). In modern Swedish this particular French loanword has taken that particular form, but intressant has kept (ish) its original French form despite the endings of both being pronounced identically in French. It's basically luck of the draw how foreign words are ultimately adopted and modified. I can well believe that when the fashion for calling your eatery something French first caught on, there will have been some owners who used the "authentic" French spelling (albeit with Swedish case endings) and others who thought it better to respell it using Swedish orthography to give an approximation of the French sound.

As to Kneipp - there seems to be a whole area of Norrköping named Kneippen after a spa complex that was set up there around the turn of the last century (specifically active 1898-1918): Wikipedia in Swedish.

There are a few hits on Kneipp in Oslo as well, and it is not unknown for Norwegian hoteliers etc. to order their tokens from Sporrong especially before Norwegian independence, but my 50 öre is on this being from Norrköping.

Figleaf

Quote from: FosseWay on January 05, 2021, 10:44:58 AM
Either of your suggestions works time-wise - the high point of the use of these kyparpolletter was late 1880s to WW1.

Quote from: FosseWay on December 07, 2016, 08:46:28 PM
(...) kyparpolletter were common across Sweden in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, but it is not entirely clear how they were used. I paraphrase here the suggestion given by Wiséhn and Golabiewsky in Stockholmspolletter:

Kyparpolletter may have been used to speed up the transaction process in such establishments, but also to safeguard the establishment's income from light-fingered waiters. At the start of the day, waiters paid cash for an equivalent amount in tokens. They used the tokens to "pay" the kitchen or bar for each meal or drink ordered, and kept the cash tendered by the customer. Customers could also buy tokens to use directly at the bar [my addition: possibly at a discount, in an analogous way to how public transport tokens were sold?].

This sounds like a similar waiter's token system, popular e.g. in Germany, where the objective was to keep the waiters honest. Customers would buy the tokens at a window kept by a trusted employee (often the wife of the owner). They'd pay the waiter with the tokens, so the waiters wouldn't handle cash.

Quote from: FosseWay on January 05, 2021, 10:44:58 AM
As to Kneipp - there seems to be a whole area of Norrköping named Kneippen after a spa complex that was set up there around the turn of the last century (specifically active 1898-1918)

See the text Kneipp baden below the picture on the post card.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.