Author Topic: Uzbekistan: post-Soviet coinage  (Read 386 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Uzbekistan: post-Soviet coinage
« Reply #15 on: October 18, 2020, 12:11:06 AM »
In 1997 Uzbekistan issued three new high denominations.


The 1 som coin weighed 2.72 grams and had a diameter of 19.8 mm.

The 5 som coin weighed 4 grams and had a diameter of 22.2 mm.

The 10 som coin weighed 4.7 grams and had a diameter of 24 mm.


The 1 and 10 som coins were issued from 1997 through to the year 2000.

The 5 som coin was issued from 1997 trough to 1999.


The coins were all made of nickel-plated steel.

The obverse and revese designs followed the format of the previous Uzbek coins.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Uzbekistan: post-Soviet coinage
« Reply #16 on: October 18, 2020, 12:34:49 AM »
In the year 2000 Uzbekistan issued a new 1 som coin with a different design on the reverse.

The 1 som coin weighed 2.83 grams and had a diameter of 18.8 mm.


The coin was made of nickel-clad steel, as before.

The reverse design showed the denomination and a map of Uzbekistan.


Similar 5 and 10 som coins were issued in 2001.

The 5 som coin was made of brass-plated steel.

It weighed 3.35 grams and had a diameter of 21.2 mm.


The 10 som coin was made of nickel-plated steel.

It weighed 2.75 grams and had a diameter of 20 mm.


The text on the coins was now no longer in Cyrillic script but in the Latin alphabet.

The obverse legend translated as 'Central Bank of Uzbekistan'.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2020, 02:10:19 AM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Uzbekistan: post-Soviet coinage
« Reply #17 on: October 18, 2020, 01:55:20 AM »
In 2018 Uzbekistan issued a new coin series. The four coins were all made of nickel-plated steel.


The 50 som coin weighed 2 grams and had a diameter of 18 mm.

The 100 som coin weighed 2.5 grams and had a diameter of 20 mm.

The 200 som coin weighed 3.3 grams and had a diameter of 22 mm.

The 500 som coin weighed 3.9 grams and had a diameter of 24 mm.


Below you see the common obverse of the coins.

It shows the national emblem.

The legend translates as 'Central Bank of Uzbekistan'.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Uzbekistan: post-Soviet coinage
« Reply #18 on: October 18, 2020, 01:59:39 AM »
The reverse designs of the 2018 coins.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Uzbekistan: post-Soviet coinage
« Reply #19 on: October 18, 2020, 02:00:46 AM »
The 100 som coin depicts the Monument to the Independence of Uzbekistan.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Uzbekistan: post-Soviet coinage
« Reply #20 on: October 18, 2020, 02:05:15 AM »
The 200 som coin depicts a decoration on the archway of the Sher-Dor Madrasah building in Samarkand.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Uzbekistan: post-Soviet coinage
« Reply #21 on: October 18, 2020, 02:06:16 AM »
A similar design appeared on the 200 som banknote of 1997.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Uzbekistan: post-Soviet coinage
« Reply #22 on: October 18, 2020, 02:07:22 AM »
The 500 som coin depicts the Tashkent Congress Centre.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Uzbekistan: post-Soviet coinage
« Reply #23 on: October 18, 2020, 02:08:31 AM »
A similar design appeared on the 50 000 som banknote of 2017.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Uzbekistan: post-Soviet coinage
« Reply #24 on: October 18, 2020, 02:12:24 AM »
That brings my topic up to date, I believe.
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Online Figleaf

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Re: Uzbekistan: post-Soviet coinage
« Reply #25 on: October 18, 2020, 11:55:36 AM »
For coins, yes, but since you don't hesitate to bring in banknotes and stamps, see here for Uzbek bus tokens. The 1994 token (TKB01) is inscribed in Russian, the others in Uzbek, reflecting a policy to bring Uzbek up to the national language on the same level as Russian. You can see the same change on the post 2000 coins. Yet, Toshkent underground tokens are still in Russian.

Peter
« Last Edit: October 18, 2020, 12:08:43 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: Uzbekistan: post-Soviet coinage
« Reply #26 on: October 18, 2020, 06:16:24 PM »
Back to coins, and the 1994 series from Uzbekistan. I was looking at them on numista:

Uzbekistan standard circulation coins of 1994.

For almost every coin in that series, numista show interesting variations if you click on the individual entries. You must scroll right to the bottom of the page in order to see them, though.


See, for instance, the 1 Tiyin coin of 1994:



Image copyright of numista.


There is more, if you click on the images of the other coins in the series.
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Offline <k>

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Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.