Author Topic: Well, it's a coin!  (Read 281 times)

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Offline brandm24

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Well, it's a coin!
« on: July 25, 2020, 12:33:34 PM »
This 1979 Susan B Anthony dollar just happens to be "surrounded" by a belt buckle. Not sure I've seen a buckle with a coin as the center of the design before.

Apparently, the western-themed buckle can be disassembled and the coin removed or another can be inserted.

Bruce
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Well, it's a coin!
« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2020, 04:41:48 PM »
It certainly is, used as a decoration. Belt buckle decorations are exotic stuff around here, but coins used as decorations are not. Here are some spectacular pieces from the collection of the Trakai museum, housed in the eponymous castle on the eponymous island, all three in Lithuania. :) Most coins are Russian or German states, around 1750.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline brandm24

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Re: Well, it's a coin!
« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2020, 05:50:06 PM »
Those should warm the heart of even the most cantankerous coin collector, Peter. Very nice work and appealing as such. Do you know who made them?

Belt buckles, especially western themed one, are pretty seriously collected in this country. I'm not sure what Susan B. Anthony has to do with the old wild west but her coin fits in nicely. SBA was strictly an east-coaster.

Bruce
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Well, it's a coin!
« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2020, 12:47:17 AM »
No idea who made them. Probably a Vilnius silver smith. These are just a few of what they had, in addition to some fine, but quite over-cleaned hoards.

Perhaps the belt buckle marketing guy wasn't a coin collector and he took the coin for a Washington quarter >:D After all, that guy with the pig tail couldn't possibly be male.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline brandm24

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Re: Well, it's a coin!
« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2020, 11:22:32 AM »
These SBA's don't circulate much here and people do mix them up for quarters at times. They're bad enough but when people get their hands on an Eisenhower dollar or Kennedy half they really don't know what to do. ???

Bruce
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Well, it's a coin!
« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2020, 11:38:30 AM »
Looking for fun coin-decorated articles, I came across this piece of Kurdish jewellery decorated with late Ottoman coins. We have a number of coin pictures with holes and clasps from Central and West Asia on WoC. We tend to call them clothing decoration, but that may be a bit too easy.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline brandm24

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Re: Well, it's a coin!
« Reply #6 on: July 29, 2020, 12:16:40 PM »
That's a beautiful piece of artwork, Peter. I very much admire people who are so skilled in what they do. Not only in art but in every aspect of life. Dedication, determination and the pursuit of excellence are wonderful traits that are to be admired.

Bruce
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Offline brandm24

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Re: Well, it's a coin!
« Reply #7 on: July 29, 2020, 12:55:49 PM »
The US Trade Dollar was minted only from 1873 until 1878 and was specifically used to compete with the Spanish 8-Reales and other foreign silver coins in the China trade. Because they contained a different amount of silver they were not legal to circulate in the US. Production ceased in 1878 because it never competed well with the others.

I always had an interest in these box dollars or so-called opium dollars, most fashioned from the Trade Dollars.It took two coins to fashion the box. One was hollowed out and the second to make a lid to seal it. When pressed, a small spring mechanism would pop open the lid to reveal the contents. Since they were thought to be often used to carry small anoints of opium undetected, they became known as opium dollars

Other uses and the more likely one was that they were used as lockets to house pictures of loved ones. It could also be carried by a "gentleman" with a mistress on the side.

Bruce
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Well, it's a coin!
« Reply #8 on: July 29, 2020, 11:39:56 PM »
Hollow coin boxes were made in the UK also. The two halves were screwed together, with the seam between them becoming virtually invisible. They are said to be prisoners' escape tools. The coin would contain a coiled thread saw. The saw would go around a bar in a cell window, the ends wound around two of the escapee's fingers. I have seen a hollow coin with a saw inside, but don't know who put it in. ;)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Well, it's a coin!
« Reply #9 on: July 29, 2020, 11:45:06 PM »
Here's another coin-decorated item, a tea strainer with common 3 Kreuzer coins 1680, 1681 or 1682 from the bishopric of Salzburg. The unidentified coin on the handle is dated 1773, giving the earliest date of the item. Coin-including silverware was fashionable in Germany and Austria around 1750-1850. Source.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline brandm24

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Re: Well, it's a coin!
« Reply #10 on: July 30, 2020, 12:06:14 AM »
Hollow coin boxes were made in the UK also. The two halves were screwed together, with the seam between them becoming virtually invisible. They are said to be prisoners' escape tools. The coin would contain a coiled thread saw. The saw would go around a bar in a cell window, the ends wound around two of the escapee's fingers. I have seen a hollow coin with a saw inside, but don't know who put it in. ;)

Peter
As you can see by the picture of the Trade Dollar the workmanship is excellent. The seam is basically invisible making the coin appear to be a standard issue piece.

Many, many Trade Dollars that have survived are chop marked. The chops were added by Chinese merchants, bankers, and money-changers to validate their silver content. Rather than detract from the value the chops sometimes increase the coin's market worth. Though not rare, un-chopped coins are a bit scarce.

I know the British issued a large silver coin just for the China trade, but does anyone know of any other country that did so?

BTW, Peter , you seem to know a bit about prison escape techniques. Experienced, are we?  ;D

Bruce
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Offline brandm24

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Re: Well, it's a coin!
« Reply #11 on: October 19, 2020, 04:51:27 PM »
Here's a handsome silver ring with a Mercury Dime inserted. It looks well crafted so sacrificing the coin isn't so bad. :)

Bruce
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