Author Topic: US sales tax tokens  (Read 12746 times)

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Offline gpimper

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Re: US sales tax tokens
« Reply #45 on: October 08, 2020, 01:59:43 AM »
I think could turn out to be a fun thread  :-)
The Chief...aka Greg

Offline FosseWay

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Re: US sales tax tokens
« Reply #46 on: October 08, 2020, 06:58:37 AM »
the difference between cats and dogs has disappeared.

On behalf of cats across the world, I protest at that statement!  ;D

Offline Figleaf

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Re: US sales tax tokens
« Reply #47 on: October 08, 2020, 10:26:29 AM »
Peter, there are countries that tax guinea pigs ?

Yes, The UK. As a consequence of the Duty on Hair Powder Act and the Hair Powder Certificates etc. Act 1795: According to author Jenny Uglow, those who chose to pay the guinea hair powder tax were nicknamed "guinea-pigs" by reformist Whigs who chose instead to cut their hair short (the "French" cut) and go without a wig as an expression of solidarity with the French. So a whig without a wig was a guinea pig.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline gpimper

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Re: US sales tax tokens
« Reply #48 on: October 08, 2020, 04:16:19 PM »
1937-40 Arizona 1 mil sales tax token.  https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces20853.html
The Chief...aka Greg

Offline Figleaf

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Re: US sales tax tokens
« Reply #49 on: October 08, 2020, 06:56:52 PM »
Another one issued by the state tax office. I am now wondering if there is a connection between being state-issued and not have a denomination expressed in mils.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: US sales tax tokens
« Reply #50 on: October 08, 2020, 10:14:56 PM »
Another one issued by the state tax office. I am now wondering if there is a connection between being state-issued and not have a denomination expressed in mils.

 ???

All the tokens shown so far in this thread have a denomination in mills and are issued by the state tax office. What am I not understanding?

Looking through "U.S. State-issued Sales Tax Tokens" by Jerry F. Schimmel (2nd edition, 1980), I find only one token that is denominated in a unit of money other than mills (a 1/5 cent token from Colorado). All the others with one significant exception are in mills, or in the case of Illinois, fractions thereof.

The exception is the state of Washington, which expresses on its tokens either the amount on which the tax is payable (tax on purchase of 10c (or 13c, 14c) or less) or the percentage rate at which the tax is levied (3% Tax Token).

Offline gpimper

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Re: US sales tax tokens
« Reply #51 on: October 08, 2020, 10:28:48 PM »
I've some Washington tokens but they are back of the bus :-)  (alphabeticly speaking).  Only 12 states issued these tokens.
The Chief...aka Greg

Offline Figleaf

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Re: US sales tax tokens
« Reply #52 on: October 09, 2020, 09:19:11 AM »
All the tokens shown so far in this thread have a denomination in mills

They have, but the word mil doesn't show on the token. I haven't done any stats, but from memory, I think it is missing on quite a few tokens.

and are issued by the state tax office.

Many are issued by a state government agency, but there are plenty issued by private organisations also.

So my question was whether there is a correlation between not having the word mil (or mils) and being issued by a public organisation. Section 8 of the US constitution permits Congress to coin money and to regulate its value. Section 10 denies states the right to coin or to print their own money.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: US sales tax tokens
« Reply #53 on: October 09, 2020, 09:39:53 AM »
They have, but the word mil doesn't show on the token. I haven't done any stats, but from memory, I think it is missing on quite a few tokens.

Oh, I see  :)

I didn't see that as significant but rather just a feature of the design. Rather like some countries' coins have just a numeral on, such as Switzerland, pre-1918 Austria, some Isle of Man coins etc.

What I find more perplexing is quite why Washington "denominated" its tax tokens in such an opaque way. Everywhere else used mills (or fractions of a cent, which amounts to the same thing).

Offline malj1

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Re: US sales tax tokens
« Reply #54 on: October 09, 2020, 11:41:21 PM »
I have merged the previous large thread of US sales tax tokens with this topic, see above.

Washington state has another topic here too; see Washington Sales Tax Token
Malcolm
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Offline gpimper

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Re: US sales tax tokens
« Reply #55 on: October 12, 2020, 05:56:00 PM »
1937-1942 Missouri 1 and 5 mills tax tokens.  Same on both sides of each.  Seems zinc doesn't hold up well over time!  https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces20747.html
The Chief...aka Greg

Offline Figleaf

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Re: US sales tax tokens
« Reply #56 on: October 12, 2020, 11:36:14 PM »
If that token is affected by zinc pest, it's going to crumble away and it may contaminate other zinc stuff, so keep it separate in a dry, well ventilated place. For more info, have a look here. For a possible remedy, see here.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline gpimper

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Re: US sales tax tokens
« Reply #57 on: October 13, 2020, 01:02:57 AM »
I'm trying the sonic with baking soda...we'll see.  Thanks for the tips!
The Chief...aka Greg