Author Topic: Non-metallic tokens  (Read 838 times)

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Online Figleaf

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Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #60 on: November 09, 2020, 01:38:06 PM »
A standard heraldic stork or heron with one leg raised should have a cannonball or rock in the raised leg, not in the beak, which may be empty or not. This rule goes for all countries using European heraldry, though admittedly, the cannon ball is often enough omitted, probably due to ignorance. Here, the cannon ball is replaced by what is in fact the Utrecht mint mark, whether or not that is the intention of the attribute.

Nacre should be less common in Sweden, as it would have had to come through Germany or maybe Russia, while it is plentiful in the Netherlands Indies and the region around it.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online brandm24

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Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #61 on: November 09, 2020, 03:34:47 PM »
Well, I think we're at a stand off here, so I'm declaring it a SweDutch token. That should keep everybody happy. ;D

Bruce
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Online brandm24

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Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #62 on: November 17, 2020, 03:29:45 PM »
Hard rubber tokens are interesting though a little unusual. There are some American Civil War tokens "struck" on rubber but not many.

The only information I found on manufacturingg techniques discussed those struck on rubber sheets with a hot die. After cooling they were punched out or cut into individual pieces by hand. There are probably other methods but I didn't come across any other information about their manufacture.

Bruce
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Online brandm24

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Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #63 on: November 17, 2020, 09:18:14 PM »
Here's one of the Civil War rubber tokens mentioned last post.

Bruce
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Online Henk

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Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #64 on: November 20, 2020, 03:16:39 PM »
An example from Germany. The token looks like some kind of black plastic, could also be hard rubber. In Menzel only the colour is mentioned. The token dates from before 1900. Is is already mentioned in a 1898 auction catalog. It is from the ALGEMEINE ARMEN ANSTALT (general poor institution), the arms are from the city of Hamburg and it is good for 1 PORTION SPEISE (portion of food). The diameter is 35 mm

Online brandm24

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Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #65 on: November 20, 2020, 04:55:37 PM »
I'm not sure plastic tokens were so common pre-1900, at least not here. Germany maybe. My guess would be that it's rubber by its looks, Henk.

Bruce
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Offline malj1

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Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #66 on: November 20, 2020, 11:16:02 PM »
See Re: Manufacturers of UK transportation tokens for information on the materials used.

Also see WoT article Production of UK transport tokens
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Online Henk

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Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #67 on: November 21, 2020, 08:18:36 PM »
A "plastic" transport token from Argentine, Buenos Ayres first class tramways token diameter 30 mm

Online brandm24

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Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #68 on: November 21, 2020, 08:29:20 PM »
See Re: Manufacturers of UK transportation tokens for information on the materials used.

Also see WoT article Production of UK transport tokens
All good information, Mal. Many thanks.

Bruce
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