Author Topic: Non-metallic tokens  (Read 833 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Henk

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 374
Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #30 on: October 24, 2020, 12:39:46 PM »
Cardboard bridge token for the bridge over the Ruhr in Kettwich. Specification:

25 mm blue cardboard, 0,50 mm thick
O: Gut für / 1 Pfg. / Ruhrbrücke / Kettwig
R: (blank)

The German city of Kettwig became part of the city of Essen in 1975. It is situated on the river Ruhr. The original bridge, dating from the 13th century was dismantled in 1635. A new bridge was opened in 1865. To pass the bridge a fee of 1 pfennig had to be paid. The fee for carts was 3 pfennig. The toll was abolished on 15 May 1930.

The postcard picturing the bridge dats from around 1912

Offline brandm24

  • BR & M
  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1 411
Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #31 on: October 24, 2020, 01:14:07 PM »
That's one of the older cardboard tokens I've seen, Henk. I don't know when cardboard was first used for token making, but I've only seen them back to 1867 on shell cards...and they're mot true cardboard issues because only one side is cardboard. They were also encased with a brass shell which gave the piece durability.

Thanks for posting yours as I haven't come across many non-US tokens.

Bruce
Always Faithful

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31 514
Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #32 on: October 24, 2020, 01:49:25 PM »
And a very simple cardboard token for 50 céntimos from Anglès in Catalonia. Not sure of the date but I'd guess 1930s before the civil war.

See this thread.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31 514
Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #33 on: October 24, 2020, 02:16:20 PM »
This type of token is known as a shellcard. There are several types and include a thin medal (brass usually) shell embossed with a design and having a cardboard, another metal or mirror obverse. The printed side of course is where th advertisement appears.

See here

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31 514
Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #34 on: October 24, 2020, 02:20:23 PM »
Yet another type of non-metallic token.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31 514
Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #35 on: October 24, 2020, 02:21:39 PM »
Question: memory says that there are Mexican civil war tokens made of soap. Can anyone confirm?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline brandm24

  • BR & M
  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1 411
Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #36 on: October 25, 2020, 01:07:25 PM »
Question: memory says that there are Mexican civil war tokens made of soap. Can anyone confirm?

Peter
Haven't heard of them, Peter, but I'll look into it. Very interesting.

Bruce
Always Faithful

Offline brandm24

  • BR & M
  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1 411
Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #37 on: October 25, 2020, 01:13:20 PM »
Putting the soap aside for a minute, here are a few odd-shaped cardboard tokens. :)

The odd Rexall piece is described as a token but no reverse is shown so I don't know it's value or what it's for. A very unusual shape nevertheless. Wilder's Dairy was in Santa Cruz, California and Oasis' in Napa.

Bruce
Always Faithful

Offline brandm24

  • BR & M
  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1 411
Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #38 on: October 26, 2020, 03:22:32 PM »
Question: memory says that there are Mexican civil war tokens made of soap. Can anyone confirm?

Peter
I looked into the possibility, Peter, but wasn't able to come up with any information. I'll keep at it.

Bruce
Always Faithful

Offline brandm24

  • BR & M
  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1 411
Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #39 on: October 26, 2020, 04:40:32 PM »
Well, I found some tokens (or medals) made of soap, but nothing from Mexico. The British coronation / jubilee pieces were amde by Vignolia Soap...not sure about the French token. I couldn't get decent pictures but I'll post them all anyway.

Bruce
Always Faithful

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31 514
Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #40 on: October 26, 2020, 06:59:28 PM »
Great stuff Bruce. Soap tokens. Ain't numismatics fun?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline brandm24

  • BR & M
  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1 411
Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #41 on: October 26, 2020, 07:09:29 PM »
I'm glad you mentioned the Mexican soap tokens, Peter. I would have never thought to search for anything "minted" on soap. Now that's NOT metallic.

The jubilee and coronation pieces are obviously keepsakes although I suppose you could use them for a quick wash in an emergency. :) I came across anothet British coronation piece that was packaged in a cellophane (?) pack but the image was so poor that I couldn't copy it. The package was printed with the manufacturer's (Vinolia) name and other information.

Bruce
« Last Edit: October 26, 2020, 09:58:12 PM by brandm24 »
Always Faithful

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31 514
Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #42 on: October 26, 2020, 07:41:21 PM »
Emile Guimet (1836-1918) got rich with soap. In 1876, he made a "grand tour" around the world as a follow-up to trips to Egypt and Greece, visiting Japan, China and India. He bought a shipload of art in these countries and created a museum of Asia and Egypt in his native Lyon in 1879. It closed in 1889 because it had become too small. Emile found a new place for his immodest collection in Paris. He soon got competition from other Parisian museums, so he concentrated more and more on Asian art.

After his death, the Guimet museum became state-owned. One of the first director, Joseph Hackin, led archeological digs in Afghanistan. He fixed up the museum and added a rich collection of central Asian artifacts. Even today, the Musée Guimet is a pearl that easily surpasses larger collections.

Trying to find out if Crémantine was the name of the woman or a brand of soap (it's the latter), I found the advertising poster that inspired the token.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline brandm24

  • BR & M
  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1 411
Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #43 on: October 26, 2020, 09:56:16 PM »
Thanks for the history of the French soap maker, Peter.

I went back to see if I could clean up the picture of the cello-wrapped George VI coronation soap medal I spoke of a couple of posts ago. It's pretty clear now though a bit small. Reminds me of wrapped US mint sets or individual coins. Definately a keepsake.

Bruce
Always Faithful

Offline Afrasi

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2 598
  • To do is to doo be dooh ...
Re: Non-metallic tokens
« Reply #44 on: October 26, 2020, 10:27:17 PM »
I miss Africa in this thread. ;-) There were many off-metalic tokens in South Africa and some from Egypt, Ethiopia and Kenya. In many other countries exist a few pieces. This one is from Guinea-Bissau:

Bernardo Soller Successor, Bissao
Half Peso
30 mm
Bakelite (?)
As far as I know this piece is not listed in any catalogue.