Author Topic: Denominational anomalies of the euro collector coins  (Read 450 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Denominational anomalies of the euro collector coins
« Reply #15 on: October 10, 2020, 03:33:57 PM »


Monaco, 10 euro, 2019.  Another use of the euro symbol.


Monaco, one of Figleaf's favourite flyspecks.

Full of filthy rich tax exiles who refuse to pay tax in their own countries - the countries they made their money in.

What right does it have to be a country?

Time to return it to Italy, I say.  :o
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Offline <k>

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Re: Denominational anomalies of the euro collector coins
« Reply #16 on: October 10, 2020, 03:58:21 PM »
Belgium, 12½ euro, 2019.

12½ euro now. It gets worse.  ::)
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Offline <k>

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Re: Denominational anomalies of the euro collector coins
« Reply #17 on: October 10, 2020, 04:02:01 PM »
Come on, Cyprus. It's decision time! Where do you want the € symbol? In front, or behind?
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Offline brandm24

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Re: Denominational anomalies of the euro collector coins
« Reply #18 on: October 10, 2020, 04:08:06 PM »
Yes. 100 Eurocent = €1. :)

Aditya
Thanks, Aditya, I should have realized that. Still, expressing the denomination as 700 cents seems odd to me. It would be the same as expressing the value of a US dollar as 100 cents. Accurate, but it would confuse the heck out of everybody.

Bruce
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Offline <k>

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Re: Denominational anomalies of the euro collector coins
« Reply #19 on: October 10, 2020, 04:09:12 PM »
Come on, Estonia. It's decision time! Where do you want the € symbol? In front, or behind?

And 7 euro, for goodness' sake. Of what use is that to anyone?
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Offline Bimat

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Denominational anomalies of the euro collector coins
« Reply #20 on: October 10, 2020, 04:13:25 PM »
Thanks, Aditya, I should have realized that. Still, expressing the denomination as 700 cents seems odd to me. It would be the same as expressing the value of a US dollar as 100 cents. Accurate, but it would confuse the heck out of everybody.

It's indeed confusing. Fortunately, it's a collector coin (costs anywhere between €120-€150 these days, issue price was €60) so nobody will find it in circulation. Had it been a circulation issue, I am quite sure that someone would have done shopping worth €700 using a single coin and a newspaper headline next morning. ;D

Aditya
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Offline Bimat

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Denominational anomalies of the euro collector coins
« Reply #21 on: October 10, 2020, 04:18:54 PM »
And 7 euro, for goodness' sake. Of what use is that to anyone?

Portugal has issued several €7.5 collector coins and you are complaining about €7? ;D (And the base metal versions of those €7.5 coins could be bought for face value at the time of release so you can technically use them as a mode of payment only in Portugal - it's perfectly legal and allowed).

What I find interesting is the use of euro symbol €. Most of the times, it is before the numeric (like €7) and very few instances of using it after the numeric (as it happens with the Estonian 7€ or Portuguese 7.5€).

Aditya
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Offline <k>

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Re: Denominational anomalies of the euro collector coins
« Reply #22 on: October 10, 2020, 04:24:27 PM »
And if 7.5 euros wasn't bad enough, now Portugal has stolen the penguins of the Falkland Islands and South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands.  >:(
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Offline <k>

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Re: Denominational anomalies of the euro collector coins
« Reply #23 on: October 10, 2020, 04:33:50 PM »
Luxembourg, 10 euro, 2006.

On the rare occasions when Luxembourg has used the euro symbol on its collector coins, it appears at the end of the denomination.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Denominational anomalies of the euro collector coins
« Reply #24 on: October 10, 2020, 04:41:18 PM »
Netherlands, 5 euro, 2010 and 2018.

The Netherlands also can't decide where the euro symbol should go.  :o
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Offline <k>

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Re: Denominational anomalies of the euro collector coins
« Reply #25 on: October 10, 2020, 04:56:52 PM »
I have concluded my survey.

So far as I can see, Portugal is the only euro zone country that has used the Anglo-Saxon method for showing decimals: 1.5.

Though Portugal has also at times used the Continental way: 1,5.

Somebody (not me!) should make a list of the denominations that each euro zone country has used for its collector coins.
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Offline redlock

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Re: Denominational anomalies of the euro collector coins
« Reply #26 on: October 10, 2020, 08:54:47 PM »
Somebody (not me!) should make a list of the denominations that each euro zone country has used for its collector coins.

Indeed, that has already been done!!  ;D

Someone on a German speaking coin collector forum has put the information together.
Am I allowed to post the link to the site on the German forum here on WoC?
If not, please, remove this link:
https://www.emuenzen.de/forum/threads/uebersicht-ueber-die-nominale-der-nationalen-euro-sammlermuenzen.76899/

I think <k> probably likes the €19,18 from Lithuania the most  >:D

Offline eurocoin

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Re: Denominational anomalies of the euro collector coins
« Reply #27 on: October 10, 2020, 09:15:14 PM »
Am I allowed to post the link to the site on the German forum here on WoC?

Of course. In contrary to that other forum, WoC doesn't have a rule that forbids members to link to other forums.

Offline <k>

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Re: Denominational anomalies of the euro collector coins
« Reply #28 on: October 10, 2020, 11:13:13 PM »
Indeed, that has already been done!!  ;D

Someone on a German speaking coin collector forum has put the information together.

Excellent. Thank you for the link.

Quote
I think <k> probably likes the €19,18 from Lithuania the most  >:D

It's a total obscenity!  :anger: 

I see there is a symbolism in the number, though - it refers to the year 1918.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Denominational anomalies of the euro collector coins
« Reply #29 on: October 10, 2020, 11:24:24 PM »
I think <k> probably likes the €19,18 from Lithuania the most  >:D

So, look at what redlock has written above.





Now look at how the euro amount is expressed above on that Portuguese coin.

Which is correct, and why? Does it vary from country to country?
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