Author Topic: Spanish euro coin variations  (Read 250 times)

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Offline <k>

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Spanish euro coin variations
« on: October 03, 2020, 12:35:24 AM »
It's not often I look at euro coins. However, I noticed for the first time this band around some of the stars on the country side of the Spanish coins that was removed in later years. Does anybody know the reason for this?

You see other variations on the Spanish 1 euro coin. The year is at first shown separated by a star, but later this is changed and the year is moved. And the position of the mint mark changes too.

I haven't time right now to look at the 2 euro coin with the Juan Carlos portrait. Is there more than one variation for the 2 euro coin with this portrait?
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Offline CannedMeat

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Re: Spanish euro coin variations
« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2020, 01:50:30 PM »
The first set of obverse designs were used for coins issued 1999-2009. KM# 1040-1047. Starting 2007 the reverse design changed (new common map) so 10 cent and up are KM# 1070-1074 from 2007-2009.

The second obverse designs for all eight types started in 2010, KM# 1144-1151.

And in 2015 coins for Philip VI were issued so the 1 and 2 Euro coins are new types, KM# 1327-1328.

https://en.numista.com/catalogue/index.php?e=espagne&r=euro&ct=coin&tb=y&cat=y&ru=&ca=3&no=&v=&d=&i=&a=&dg=1999-&m=&f=&t=&w=&u=&g=&se=&c=&wi=&sw=

Offline <k>

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Re: Spanish euro coin variations
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2020, 02:33:24 PM »
Thank you. So the band holding some of the stars was removed, simply to coincide with the new map?

I wondered also if there was any reason why, on some coins, four stars were within the band, and on others. five.
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Offline eurocoin

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Re: Spanish euro coin variations
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2020, 03:26:10 PM »
In December 2008, the European Commission issued a non-binding recommendation that was published in January 2009. It amongst other things mentioned:

"Design of the national sides: The national side of the euro coins intended for circulation should bear the 12 European stars that should fully surround the national design, including the year mark and the indication of the issuing Member State’s name. The European stars should be depicted as on the European flag".

In 2010 Spain changed its obverse designs to fully comply with the things mentioned in the recommendation.

In 2012 the recommendation was changed into a binding regulation, which mentions a deadline of 20 June 2062 by which member states need to have changed the designs on their coins to comply with the requirements mentioned therein. Several member states currently do not comply with it and have no plans to change their desings. The deadline is of course completely pointless too as Europe will long be cashless by then.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2020, 05:27:07 PM by eurocoin »

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Spanish euro coin variations
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2020, 05:12:29 PM »
Yes, it's to satisfy the requirement quoted by eurocoin.

Belgium failed to meet the requirement by not having its name or other obvious identifying feature on its first issue, and later added "BE" to comply with it.

Offline <k>

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Re: Spanish euro coin variations
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2020, 05:34:49 PM »
Thank you, eurocoin.  Thank you, FosseWay.

That explains it.  :)
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Spanish euro coin variations
« Reply #6 on: October 05, 2020, 11:19:40 AM »
As you may have noticed even though you usually do not look at euro coins ;) the Austrian and German pieces with the "2002" designs have not been updated so far. The text of the regulation simply took the "average lifetime" of a coin into account.

These two countries do however comply with the law when it comes to coins issued after the regulation became effective. As for Spain, the circle of stars would have been modified anyway when Felipe became king. In my opinion, "emphasizing" some stars this way was interesting but a little gimmicky: On the €1 and €2 coin it would at least correspond to the highlighted country name, but on the cent denominations it looked somewhat odd.

Also, they missed the opportunity to structure the 10, 20 and 50 c designs a little better. Again IMO only of course, but the combination of various text elements, especially the way "Cervantes" is written, leaves some room for improvement.

Christian