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Post-communist coinage of Romania

Started by <k>, September 28, 2020, 11:52:59 PM

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<k>

#15


The simple reverse design of the 100 lei coin featured a sprig of laurel leaves and oak leaves.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#16


The first new 1 leu coin of the series was issued in 1992. It was a one year issue only.

The coin had a diameter of 19.2 mm and was made of copper-plated steel.


The obverse featured the logo of the National Bank of Romania.

The reverse featured two stylised ears of wheat.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#17


The 5 lei coin of the series was issued in 1992.

The coin had a diameter of 21 mm and was made of nickel-plated steel.


One side showed the coat of arms, while the other side showed six stylised oak leaves.

Here the country name and denomination are shown together, in contrast to the other coins.

Usually the side with the country name is regarded as the obverse.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#18


In 1993 a new 10 lei coin replaced the circulating independence commemorative of 1990 to 1992.

The new coin retained the same physical characteristics:

namely, it had a diameter of 23 mm and was made of nickel-clad steel.


The obverse design featured the coat of arms.

The reverse design featured a stylised wreath.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#19


In 1993 a new 1 leu coin replaced the one-year type of 1992.

The coin had a diameter of 19.1 mm and was made of copper-plated steel.


One side showed the coat of arms.

The other side featured two standing ears of wheat.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#20


By 1998 inflation was rising fast.

An aluminium 500 lei coin was issued.

It had a diameter of 25 mm.

One side featured a design of a wreath of stylised laurel leaves.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#21


On the other side, the coat of arms was flanked by stylised laurel leaves.

Romania has an attractive coat of arms, so here is a large image to showcase it.

 
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#22


In the year 2000, Romania added yet another high value coin to the series.

The 1000 lei coin was made of 97% aluminium and 3% magnesium.


It had a diameter of 22 mm.

Above you see the obverse of the coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#23


The reverse of the 1000 lei coin featured a portrait of Constantin Brâncoveanu (1654-1714).

He was Prince of Wallachia between 1688 and 1714.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#24


By 2001, inflation meant that another denomination was necessary.

This aluminium-magnesium 5000 lei coin was issued in 2001.

The coin was 12-sided and had a diameter of 23.5 mm

Above you see the side with the coat of arms.


Notice that the year is flanked by two dashes. This is a one-year variety.

A second variety was issued from 2002 to 2004, where the right-hand dash contains the designer's initials.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#25


Above you see the second variety of this coin.

The dash to the right-hand side of the year contained the designer's initials.

The initials are VG, for Vasile Gabor.


The numerals on this coin are shown in a fancy font.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#26
Apart from the 10 lei of 1990 to 1992, which was issued in parallel orientation only, all the coins in this series were issued in inverted orientation, as regards the obverse and reverse. Some of the same coins were also issued in parallel orientation.

1] Parallel orientation: ↑↑ (medal orientation, as it is called in the USA).

2] Inverted orientation: where the obverse and reverse are in inverted orientation: ↑↓  (coin orientation, as it is called in the USA).


The next series of coin was issued in 2005 but appeared in parallel orientation only.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#27
Romania 15 bani 1960.jpg





I have mentioned earlier how the reverse design of 10 lei coin is similar to that of the 15 bani of 1960.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#28



Romania 100 lei 1932.jpeg

The same is true of the 1998 500 lei of this series and of the 100 lei of 1932.

See also: Similar design coins.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

brandm24

Many thanks for a wonderful history lesson, <k>. The many changes in Eastern Europe have confused me to no end...and many others I would assume. Your thread answers a lot of my questions.

Generally, the post-communist coinage of Romania is pretty nice. Some are quite plain but i particularly like the 1991 50 Lei, the 1992 1 Leu, and the 2000 1000 Lei aluminum issue. It seems as time passes their coins have a better and more refined look. That's what I think at least.

One odd question I have. In reply 2 you show a map of the former eastern bloc. I notice a very small piece of territory marked as Russian between Lithuania and Poland. It just seems strange to see it "hanging out there". I was just curious as to why it's like that and if it's changed in recent years.

Bruce
Always Faithful