Author Topic: Ireland: Malone 2 pence token of 1735  (Read 311 times)

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Offline <k>

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Ireland: Malone 2 pence token of 1735
« on: September 25, 2020, 04:19:24 PM »
Image copyright of CNG Auctions.

TOKENS, IRELAND. County Antrim. Malone. Aaron Kean. CU Twopence (24.5mm, 8.74 g, 12h). Dated 1735. • WITH • COVNC ILE • AND • COVRAGE around, a dolphin left; 2 • P below / • I •/ PROMISE/ TO • PAY • THE/ BEARER • TWO/ PENCE (flourish)/ AARON • KEAN/ MALLONE/ • 1735. Davis 23; TB 23.

From the Quentin Brisley Collection of British Tokens.

The first reference is to W. J. Davis, The Nineteenth Century Token Coinage, to which are added Tokens of over One Penny Value of any Period.
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Ireland: Malone 2 pence token of 1735
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2020, 10:26:09 PM »
The listing in Davis is uninformative. It just adds the reference Aquila Smith 25 and the addition (sic) to 1735(?) I don't know why Davis doubts the date. There is a whole class of Irish tokens dated 1734-1741. They were driven out by the arrival of George II regal coins in 1736. Perhaps Davis was appalled by the second L in MALLONE instead?

Seaby lists the token as TD15 in Coins and Tokens of Ireland. Seaby says: (...) they are confined to Ulster. Compared with the regal halfpennies the Ulster twopenny tokens seem small, but very close commercial links were maintained with Scotland and it is likely that even at this date seventeenth century 'turners' (2d Scots) still remained in circulation in Northern Ireland. This would mean that the token is for 2d Scots, rather than for 2d English.

The dolphin is not natural but heraldic.

Peter
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Offline <k>

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Re: Ireland: Malone 2 pence token of 1735
« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2020, 07:09:34 AM »
The dolphin is not natural but heraldic.

It's not a dolphin but a dolphinfish: Coryphaena hippurus.
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Offline brandm24

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Re: Ireland: Malone 2 pence token of 1735
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2020, 10:10:48 AM »
I had a few questions about this token.

The first is the second "L" in Mallone. I researched this as much as I could and found many references to Malone, Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland / Ulster but none used that spelling. An old form maybe?

I also didn't find anything about Kean, but you guys probably have better access to relevant internet soures than I do. Sometimes when you investigate the issuer of a token you stumble on other information that gives a clearer overall picture.

I came across several other examples but all were the same denomination. An interesting historical piece that I wish I knew more about.

Bruce
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Ireland: Malone 2 pence token of 1735
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2020, 02:26:05 PM »
Spelling rules are a relatively recent invention. Traffic signs are even more recent. I have no reason to doubt that Mallone is Malone.

Since Davis and Seaby list only one type/denomination, it is safe to assume that there are no others. Other tokens of the place and time have the same denomination and size. Ireland's graveyards have not been inventoried as much as their US counterparts. Birth and death registers were kept in parishes. If they are preserved, their quality depends on the alcohol consumption of the registrar, paper quality, writing and spelling ability and more such factors weighing against precision.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline malj1

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Re: Ireland: Malone 2 pence token of 1735
« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2020, 02:29:45 PM »
The listing in Davis is uninformative. It just adds the reference Aquila Smith 25 and the addition (sic) to 1735(?) I don't know why Davis doubts the date.

Peter

He is not doubting the date, the (sic) is referring to Mallone with the double LL
Malcolm
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Offline FosseWay

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Re: Ireland: Malone 2 pence token of 1735
« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2020, 10:02:06 PM »
Spelling rules are a relatively recent invention. Traffic signs are even more recent. I have no reason to doubt that Mallone is Malone.

Indeed. Even today the county to the west of Derry is called Donegal, but the square in Belfast is Donegall Square. Specifically in the Irish context you also get a lot of variation as a result of different ways of transliterating Irish into English. The Irish word cruach for mountain peak may be cruach, cruagh, croagh, croach or probably others. What it says on Google Maps is often at variance with what the Ordnance Survey of Ireland has on its maps.

BTW a lovely token, and one I wasn't aware of before this thread.  :)

Offline malj1

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Re: Ireland: Malone 2 pence token of 1735
« Reply #7 on: September 27, 2020, 12:56:36 AM »
We have the same with the town of Lilydale in the shire of Lillydale.
Malcolm
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