Author Topic: Nepal Sivaka  (Read 233 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Md. Shariful Islam

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2 554
  • Tonk>Tanka>Taka
    • Coins of Medieval Bengal
Nepal Sivaka
« on: September 13, 2020, 04:43:33 PM »
Nepal post Licchavi gold Sivaka (1098-1540CE). On the obverse Shri and Shivasya on the reverse. Mass 0.89g.

Online Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31 556
Re: Nepal Sivaka
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2020, 07:13:04 AM »
An amazing coin. TFP. The very few coins I have seen of the preceding Licchavi dynasty were coppers. Since you say this coin is post-Licchavi, may I assume it is a Dev dynasty (1097-1324 AD) relic? Are these coins even catalogued anywhere?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Manzikert

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1 486
Re: Nepal Sivaka
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2020, 09:01:28 AM »
Rhodes, Gabrisch & Valdettaro 'The coinage of Nepal' 1989, 168-9, p.50, Pl. 9.

"It is a curious fact that, from the early eighth century until the mid-sixteenth century very few coins are known from Nepal." and they just list two types of sivaka, two types of silver dam and two types of copper coin for the whole period c.750-1540 AD!

They say the scarcity is "... probably due to the relative lack of trading contact between Nepal and its neighbours during this period." but perhaps there was just enough of the Lichhavi coinage around to keep internal trade going?

Alan

Offline Md. Shariful Islam

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2 554
  • Tonk>Tanka>Taka
    • Coins of Medieval Bengal
Re: Nepal Sivaka
« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2020, 10:25:06 AM »
Many thanks! I am a bit confused about rarity of this coin. Did not see much of them. Research papers indicate that these are scarce. But after the coin is firmly inside my hand, dealers whom I asked whether these are common or rare, their common reply was it is 'very common.' :D

Offline Gusev

  • Moderator
  • Meritorious Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 914
Re: Nepal Sivaka
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2020, 03:44:36 PM »
Many thanks! I am a bit confused about rarity of this coin. Did not see much of them. Research papers indicate that these are scarce. But after the coin is firmly inside my hand, dealers whom I asked whether these are common or rare, their common reply was it is 'very common.' :D

The medieval period of Nepal (750-1540) is a mystery to numismatists.
There are only four types of coins known
- gold Sivaka (1098-1126 AD)
- silver Dam (1098-1126 AD)
- copper round Damma (1274-1310 AD)
- copper square Damma (c. 1500 AD)

Gold and silver coins are often and inexpensively sold at auctions.

Copper coins are very rare and only about 10 coins are known.

"It is hard to believe that this small number of coins, can possibly have formed the whole of the currency in circulation in Nepal for the period of over four hundred years from the mid-twelfth century until the mid-sixteenth century.
Perhaps unstamped lumps of copper circulated at times, so that we have not recognised them as dating from this period. A standard weight, perhaps of gold dust, may be referred to. It is possible that coins imported from the plains were used for part of the period, although we know of no examples of Indian coins of the period having been found in Nepal. The whole situation is very unclear, and we must await further documents and coins, preferably from excavations, before the full extent of the part played by coin in the economy of Nepal during the mediaeval period can be judged."


Similar problems of the lack of medieval coins arise in many countries.
See http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,49618.0.html
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Md. Shariful Islam

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2 554
  • Tonk>Tanka>Taka
    • Coins of Medieval Bengal
Re: Nepal Sivaka
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2020, 04:40:50 PM »
Thanks Gusev for throwing light on the topic. We now have a clearer picture on coinage of medieval Nepal.

Online Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31 556
Re: Nepal Sivaka
« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2020, 09:12:29 AM »
Silver scarcity in Europe in the 10th to 13th century can be explained by mining - exhaustion of old mines, followed by discovery of rich new silver areas in Bohemia and the Harz mountain range - and political change, in particular the demise of Byzantium and assimilation of Norse kingdoms in the Kievan Rus and on Sicily plus reconquest of their possessions in North Africa. It is not clear to me how this would have influenced the coinage of Nepal, though.

I do remember that in the time of the Guptas (4th to 6th century AD), there was a period on the Indian continent when principally gold seems to have been used, but I cannot remember what the explanation was. Also, I remember reports that horses (an important element of warfare) were used as means of stocking wealth in the early Indian sultanates. The small, hardy ponies of the area would be well suited to the climate of Nepal.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Md. Shariful Islam

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2 554
  • Tonk>Tanka>Taka
    • Coins of Medieval Bengal
Re: Nepal Sivaka
« Reply #7 on: October 19, 2020, 09:21:58 AM »
Also, I remember reports that horses (an important element of warfare) were used as means of stocking wealth in the early Indian sultanates. The small, hardy ponies of the area would be well suited to the climate of Nepal.

Peter
Interesting point for the researchers!