Author Topic: Post-communist coinage of Albania  (Read 273 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Post-communist coinage of Albania
« Reply #15 on: September 03, 2020, 02:49:37 PM »


Image courtesy of CGB Numismatics Paris.



In the year 2000 Albania issued a new high denomination circulation coin.

The bimetallic 100 leke coin had an aluminium-bronze center within a copper-nickel ring.

The obverse design featured Teuta, Queen of Illyria.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Post-communist coinage of Albania
« Reply #16 on: September 03, 2020, 02:51:31 PM »


Image courtesy of CGB Numismatics Paris.



The reverse of the 100 leke coin featured another wreath, possibly of cherry blossom.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Post-communist coinage of Albania
« Reply #17 on: September 03, 2020, 03:17:28 PM »
Since then Albania has also issued a few circulating commemorative coins. Here, however, I am only concerned with regular circulation coins.


In 2008 a copper-plated steel version of the 1 lek coin was issued. Its size and obverse and reverse designs did not change.

In 2009 a brass-plated steel version of the 10 leke coin was issued. Its size and obverse and reverse designs did not change.

In 2012 a brass-plated steel version of the 20 leke coin was issued. Its size and obverse and reverse designs did not change.


Since then there have been no changes to report.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Post-communist coinage of Albania
« Reply #18 on: September 03, 2020, 03:23:01 PM »
I am unsure of the type of plant or flower shown in the wreaths on the reverse of some of the coins. If you have any ideas or information, please post it here.

See also: Wreaths and sprays on coins.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Post-communist coinage of Albania
« Reply #19 on: September 03, 2020, 03:30:35 PM »


Indigenous ethnic Albanians in Europe. On the map above, Vardarska is the Republic of North Macedonia.



From Wikipedia:

Approximately 5 million Albanians are geographically distributed across the Balkan Peninsula, with about half this number living in Albania, Kosovo, North Macedonia and Montenegro, and to a lesser extent in Croatia and Serbia. There are also significant immigrant Albanian populations in Greece.

Approximately 1.8 million Albanians are concentrated in the partially recognised Republic of Kosovo. They are geographically distributed south of the municipality of North Mitrovica and constitute the overall majority ethnic group of the territory.

In Montenegro, the Albanian population is currently estimated to be around 30,000, forming one of the constituent ethnic minority groups of the country. They predominantly live in the coastal region of Montenegro around the municipalities of Ulcinj and Bar but also around Plav in the northern region, as well as in the capital city of Podgorica in the central region.

In North Macedonia, there are more than approximately 500,000 Albanians, constituting the largest ethnic minority group in the country. The vast majority of the Albanians are chiefly concentrated around the municipalities of Tetovo and Gostivar in the north-western region, Struga and Debar in the south-western region, and around the capital of Skopje in the central region.


The historical settlement of the Arbanasi people is presently a neighborhood of Zadar in Croatia.

In Croatia, the number of Albanians stands at approximately 17.500 mostly concentrated in the counties of Istria, Split-Dalmatia and most notably in the capital city of Zagreb. The Arbanasi people who historically migrated to Bulgaria, Croatia and Ukraine live in scattered communities across Bulgaria, Croatia and Southern Ukraine.

In Serbia, the Albanians are an officially recognised ethnic minority group with a population of around 70,000. They are significantly concentrated in the municipalities of Bujanovac and Preševo in the Pčinja District.

In Romania, the number of Albanians is unofficially estimated from 500 to 10,000, mainly distributed in Bucharest. They are recognised as an ethnic minority group and are respectively represented in the Parliament of Romania.




The ethnic Albanians of Kosovo use the euro, though without being a part of the euro zone. The Serbs of Kosovo still use the Serbian dinar, however.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Post-communist coinage of Albania
« Reply #20 on: September 03, 2020, 03:35:46 PM »
Here you see the Albanian coins side by side.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Post-communist coinage of Albania
« Reply #21 on: September 27, 2020, 12:29:59 AM »
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.