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Coinage of Bosnia and Herzegovina

Started by <k>, August 31, 2020, 04:39:19 PM

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<k>

#15



In the year 2000, a 1 marka coin was issued.


Above you see the obverse of the coin.

The triangles symbolise the approximate shape of the map of Bosnia.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#16



The reverse of the 1 mark coin.


KM stands for Konvertibilna Marka.

The convertible mark is the official name of the currency.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#17



A 2 marka coin was also issued in the year 2000.


It is bimetallic, having a copper-nickel centre within a nickel-brass ring.

The 1 and 2 mark coins were produced by the Royal Mint, UK.

 
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#18



The reverse of the 2 mark coin.

The two triangles refer to the denomination.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#19



In 2005 a nickel-plated steel 5 feninga coin was issued.


Previously the 10 feninga coin had been the lowest circulating denomination.

Like the other feninga coins, the obverse showed the triangle and stars from the flag.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#20



The reverse of the 5 feninga coin.

Like the other feninga coins, the reverse featured the map of Bosnia.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#21



In 2005 a bimetallic 5 mark coin was issued.


It has a nickel-brass centre within a copper-nickel ring.

This remains the highest denomination in circulation.


The dove design is the work of Welshman Michael Guilfoyle.

 
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>




Michael Guilfoyle's original artwork for the dove design.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Since then there have been no new developments.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#25
Bosnian set.jpg

Here you see how the coins look together, size-wise.


The designs of the set are rather plain. Nothing stands out, apart from the doves, who symbolise a desire for continuing peace. Hardly surprising, given the experiences of the recent past.

There are three main ethnicities to balance, so there are no strong statements on the coins. Neutrality is the word.

Bosnia has an estimated population of 3,301,00. According to data from 2013 census published by the Agency for Statistics of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bosniaks constitute 50.11% of the population, Serbs 30.78%, Croats 15.43%, and others form 2.73%, with the remaining respondents not declaring their ethnicity or not answering. Bosnia does seem something of an artificial state: just because it was, it will be. The different ethnicities mostly speak Serbo-Croat. The Serb and Croat languages are essentially the same languages.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.