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Coinage of modern Serbia

Started by <k>, August 27, 2020, 01:15:00 PM

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<k>

#30
2 and 10 dinara coins featuring the old coat of arms were still minted into 2011 and dated 2011.

However, 2 and 10 dinara coins featuring the new coat of arms were also minted and dated from 2011 onward.


1 dinar and 5 dinara coins featuring the new coat of arms were also minted and dated from 2011 onward.


The 5 and 10 dinara coins with the new coat of arms were still minted in nickel-brass in 2011 and 2012.


From 2013 onward the 5 dinara coin was minted in brass-plated steel, like the 1 dinar and 2 dinara coins before them.

To date, the 10 dinara was last minted in 2012 and in nickel-brass.


Once more I recommend you look at the web page for Serbia on the excellent web site, coinz.eu.

There you will see the different metal types:

coinz.eu: Serbia
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#31


To my knowledge that brings the subject up to date.

Above you see a map of Serbia, as it now stands, and the surrounding area.

Serbia and several other countries still do not recognise Kosovo as an independent state.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#32
I find it interesting that Yugoslavia's coins remained biscriptal, even under the leadership of Slobodan Milosevic. Biscriptal: in this context, being in both the Cyrillic and the Latin alphabets. Independent Serbia has consistently followed that example.

As regards ethnicity, I was surprised to read this today in the Independent newspaper:

Montenegrins who identify as Serbs account for about a third of the 620,000 population. Most Montenegrins and Serbs share language and the Orthodox faith, and many Serbian citizens have roots and families in Montenegro.


Does Serbia use biscriptal text on its coins to cater for its own indigenous ethnic minorities, such as the ethnic Hungarians in Vojvodina? Or so that Westerners can read its coins? Or both?

 
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#33
DESIGN CONTINUITY BETWEEN YUGOSLAVIA AND SERBIA




Yugoslavia, 1 dinar and 2 dinara, year 2000 to 2002.





Serbia, 1 dinar and 2 dinara, year 2003.

Far left: first obverse.  Far right: current obverse.

The text on the 2 dinara reads 'Gračanica'.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

chrisild

Quote from: <k> on August 30, 2020, 04:46:32 PM
Does Serbia use biscriptal text on its coins to cater for its own indigenous ethnic minorities, such as the ethnic Hungarians in Vojvodina? Or so that Westerners can read its coins? Or both?

Neither the one nor the other, it seems. Not that I have any first hand experience ;) but ... "Serbian is a rare example of synchronic digraphia, a situation where all literate members of a society have two interchangeable writing systems available to them. Media and publishers typically select one alphabet or the other." And: "A survey from 2014 showed that 47% of the Serbian population favors the Latin alphabet whereas 36% favors the Cyrillic one." (Wikipedia)

Christian