Author Topic: Coinage of Mali  (Read 180 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21 967
Coinage of Mali
« on: July 29, 2020, 03:51:59 PM »


The fifteenth-century Sankore Mosque in Timbuktu.



From Wikipedia:

The Republic of Mali is a landlocked country in West Africa. Mali is the eighth-largest country in Africa, with an area of just over 1,240,000 square kilometres (480,000 sq mi). The population of Mali is 19.1 million. 67% of its population was estimated to be under the age of 25 in 2017. Its capital is Bamako.

Northern Mali reaches deep into the middle of the Sahara Desert. The country's southern part, where the majority of inhabitants live, features the Niger and Senegal rivers. The country's economy centers on agriculture and mining. Some of Mali's prominent natural resources include gold, being the third largest producer of gold in the African continent, and salt.

Present-day Mali was once part of three West African empires that controlled trans-Saharan trade: the Ghana Empire (for which Ghana is named), the Mali Empire (for which Mali is named), and the Songhai Empire. At its peak in 1300, the Mali Empire covered an area about twice the size of modern-day France and stretched to the west coast of Africa.

In the late 19th century, during the Scramble for Africa, France seized control of Mali, making it a part of French Sudan. In 1959 French Sudan (then known as the Sudanese Republic) joined with Senegal, achieving independence in 1960 as the Mali Federation. Shortly thereafter, following Senegal's withdrawal from the federation, the Sudanese Republic declared itself the independent Republic of Mali.

After a long period of one-party rule, a coup in 1991 led to the writing of a new constitution and the establishment of Mali as a democratic, multi-party state. In January 2012, an armed conflict broke out in northern Mali, in which Tuareg rebels took control of a territory in the north, and in April declared the secession of a new state, Azawad. The conflict was complicated by a military coup that took place in March and later fighting between Tuareg and other rebel factions. In response to territorial gains, the French military launched Opération Serval in January 2013. A month later, Malian and French forces recaptured most of the north.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Online <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21 967
Re: Coinage of Mali
« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2020, 03:53:49 PM »


Map of Mali.





Mali's location within West Africa.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Online <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21 967
Re: Coinage of Mali
« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2020, 03:56:15 PM »



From Wikipedia:

The national flag of Mali is a tricolour with three equal vertical stripes. The colours are green, gold, and red, the pan-African colours. The green stands for fertility of the land, gold stands for purity and mineral wealth and the red symbolizes the blood shed for independence from the French.

The flag of Mali is almost identical to the flag of Guinea, with the exception that the colours are in reverse order.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Online <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21 967
Re: Coinage of Mali
« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2020, 03:59:19 PM »



From Wikipedia:

The coat of arms of Mali is a national emblem consisting of a circle charged with a bird at the top, a mosque in the centre flanked by two bows and arrows, and the rising sun at the bottom. Adopted thirteen years after the country gained independence, it has been the seal of the Republic of Mali since 1973. It is utilized on official documents as a coat of arms.

At the centre of the seal is the Great Mosque of Djenné, flanked by two bows and arrows, with the rising sun pictured at the very bottom. Featured above is a bird – the species it belongs to is disputed.

The country's motto—"One People, One Goal, One Faith" (French: Un Peuple, Un But, Une Foi)—is exactly the same as Senegal's. It is featured on that country's coat of arms as well.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Online <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21 967
Re: Coinage of Mali
« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2020, 05:23:47 PM »
From Wikipedia:

The Malian franc was the independent currency of Mali between 1962 and 1984. Although technically subdivided into 100 centimes, no subdivisions were issued.

Until 1962, Mali used the West African CFA franc. The Malian franc was introduced that year at par with the CFA franc but later declined in value relative to it.

In 1962, aluminium coins were issued (dated 1961) in denominations of 5, 10 and 25 francs.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Online <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21 967
Re: Coinage of Mali
« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2020, 05:27:34 PM »


Obverse designs of the 1961 coin series.

Images courtesy Daniel's Coin Zoo.



The coins were produced and designed by the Kremnica Mint in Czechoslovakia.

The obverse of the coins featured a hippopotamus, a horse, and a lion.


To my knowledge, the hippopotamus has appeared on no other circulation coin.

It has, however, appeared on several collector coins. The rhinoceros seems to be a more popular subject.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Online <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21 967
Re: Coinage of Mali
« Reply #6 on: July 29, 2020, 05:29:07 PM »


Reverse sides of the Mali coins of 1961.

Images courtesy Daniel's Coin Zoo.



The reverse of the coins featured the denomination and a sprig of mango leaves.

 
« Last Edit: July 30, 2020, 05:02:48 PM by <k> »
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Online <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21 967
Re: Coinage of Mali
« Reply #7 on: July 30, 2020, 12:23:48 AM »
In 1975 a new coin series was started. A nickel-brass 100 francs coin was issued, showing three maize plants on the reverse. The French legend translates as 'Let's develop production'.

The 100 francs coin was issued in 1975 only. A similar nickel-brass 50 francs coin was issued from 1975 to 1977. It featured millet plants on the reverse and the phrase in French, 'Food for everybody'.

These phrases regarding food are reminiscent of FAO-themed designs, but to my knowledge these were not official FAO issues. FAO = Food and Agricultural Organisation (of the United Nations).



Aluminium 10 and 25 francs coins were issued in 1976 only. They featured rice plants on the reverse.

Notice the four triangular shapes around the denomination on the obverse of the coins. They appear to point to the similarly triangular shapes around the rim.


See also: Beads and dentillations on coins.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Online <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21 967
Re: Coinage of Mali
« Reply #8 on: July 30, 2020, 12:25:39 AM »
No more coins were issued until Mali readopted the West African CFA franc in 1984, at a rate of 2 Malian francs to 1 CFA franc.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline stef

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 89
Re: Coinage of Mali
« Reply #9 on: July 30, 2020, 03:58:22 PM »
The reverse of the coins featured the denomination and a sprig of laurel leaves.
A small correction - mango instead of laurel.

Online <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21 967
Re: Coinage of Mali
« Reply #10 on: July 30, 2020, 04:01:54 PM »
A small correction - mango instead of laurel.

Are you sure? I thought mango was an Asian fruit.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline stef

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 89
Re: Coinage of Mali
« Reply #11 on: July 30, 2020, 05:01:28 PM »
Are you sure? I thought mango was an Asian fruit.
Yes, here is a copy of the text from the law. feuilles de manguier = mango leaves.  Mali is a producer and exporter of mango.

Online <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21 967
Re: Coinage of Mali
« Reply #12 on: July 30, 2020, 05:02:21 PM »
I see. Thank you, stef.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline stef

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 89
Re: Coinage of Mali
« Reply #13 on: July 30, 2020, 07:15:32 PM »
...
The 100 francs coin was issued in 1975 only. A similar nickel-brass 50 francs coin was issued from 1975 to 1977. It featured millet plants on the reverse and the phrase in French, 'Food for everybody'.

These phrases regarding food are reminiscent of FAO-themed designs, but to my knowledge these were not official FAO issues. FAO = Food and Agricultural Organisation (of the United Nations).
...
I suppose they are official (they are included in the 1976 FAO Album, page 2).