Coinage of Mauritania

Started by <k>, July 23, 2020, 02:36:00 AM

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<k>

#15
Of this series, the 1 ouguiya was minted in 2009 only; the 5 ouguiya was last minted in 2012; the 10 ouguiya in 2013; and the 20 and 50 ouguiya in 2014.

See also: Circulation sets with a common obverse and a common reverse.


From 2017, a radical new departure was about to take place in the Mauritanian coinage.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

From Wikipedia:

On December 5, 2017, the Central Bank of Mauritania announced a redenomination of its currency at a rate of 1:10. As part of the redenomination, a new series of coins were issued in denominations of 1 khoums (​1⁄5 ouguiya), 1, 5, 10 and 20 ouguiya, with the latter being struck as a tri-metallic coin and a new series of banknotes in denominations of 50, 100, 200, 500 and 1,000 ouguiya. A 2 ouguiya coin was issued into circulation in 2018, serving as an intermediate denomination for the 1 and 5 ouguiya coins already in circulation.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#17
Mauritania 1 fifth ouguiya 2017.jpg


The lowest denomination of the new series is the ⅕ ouguiya coin.

It is made of copper-plated steel and has a diameter of 16 mm.

Below you see the obverse of the coin.

The common obverse of the series features the national emblem.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#18
Mauritania 1 fifth ouguiya 2017-.jpg


The reverse of the ⅕ ouguiya coin features a fish.

It is thought to be some kind of cod.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#19
Mauritania 1 ouguiya 2018.jpg


The 1 ouguiya is made of nickel-plated steel and has a diameter of 19.9 mm.

Above you see the obverse of the coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#20
Mauritania 1 ouguiya 2018-.jpg

The reverse of the coin features a teapot.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#21
Mauritania 2 ougiya 2018-.jpg


The 2 ouguiya is made of stainless steel and has a diameter of 24 mm.

Below you see the obverse of the coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#22
Mauritania 2 ougiya 2018.jpg


The reverse of the coin features a xalam, which is also known as a molo.

It is a sort of African lute.

The design on the coin shows a xalam overlaid over the lower part of another xalam.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#23
Mauritania 5 ouguiya 2017.jpg


The 5 ouguiya is made of nickel-plated steel.

It is heptagonal and has a diameter of 22.5 mm

Above you see the obverse of the coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#24
Mauritania 5 ouguiya 2017-.jpg


The reverse of the coin features musical instruments.

The stringed instrument is a kora.

The drum next to it is a djembe.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#25
Mauritania 10 ouguiya 2018.jpg


The 10 ouguiya is bimetallic.

It has a nickel-plated steel center within a brass-plated steel ring.

It is decagonal (10-sided) and has a diameter of 24 mm

Below you see the obverse of the coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#26
Mauritania 10 ouguiya 2018-.jpg

The reverse of the coin features a cow.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#27
Mauritania 20 ouguiya 2018.jpg


The 20 ouguiya is trimetallic.

It has a bronze-plated steel core, a nickel-plated steel middle ring and a brass-plated steel outer ring.

It has a diameter of 26 mm.

Above you see the obverse of the coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#28
Mauritania 20 ouguiya 2018-.jpg

The reverse of the coin features a camel mother with child.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#29
This latest series is a superb set with beautiful designs. Who would ever have expected such a set from conservative Mauritania?

Another country with musical instruments featured on its coins is Azerbaijan. See: Azerbaijan: post-Soviet coinage.




Turkmenistan, 2 manat, 2010.

The motifs around the rim of the reverse of the coins reminds me of similar motifs on the coins of Turkmenistan.

See: Turkmenistan: post-Soviet coinage.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.