Author Topic: Styles of numismatic design  (Read 1708 times)

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Offline chrisild

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Re: Styles of numismatic design
« Reply #30 on: July 16, 2020, 12:40:33 PM »
Stylised portraits of Queen Beatrix. Was she actually a real person?
Pretty darn sure she is. ;) The third coin should be rotated 90° clockwise by the way. (Yes, the portrait will still look abstract then.) Interesting by the way that the "Je maintiendrai" motto from the Luxembourg coronation coin also appears in the Dutch CoA ...

Christian

Offline eurocoin

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Re: Styles of numismatic design
« Reply #31 on: July 16, 2020, 01:11:05 PM »
I much prefer the high realistic portraits and am very unhappy that we no longer have them on the Dutch circulation coins, and will likely never have them anymore either.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Styles of numismatic design
« Reply #32 on: July 16, 2020, 01:28:18 PM »
Both concepts have their pros and cons, I think. Of course a portrait should be recognizable. But a stylized and almost abstract portrait you can introduce once, and then keep it until the head of state dies or abdicates - no need to adapt it. :)

We sometimes have similar discussions in Germany with regard to the eagle on our coins. Sure, that is a heraldic bird anyway and not a realistic depiction. But on quite a few pieces, mostly collector coins, you can tell there is an eagle only because you know that "this should be an eagle".

Another "style" on coins I have observed ... don't even know whether this counts as a style. But I believe landmarks and landscapes are more common on circulation coins these days than they used to be, say, 100 years ago.

Christian

Online <k>

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Re: Styles of numismatic design
« Reply #33 on: July 16, 2020, 01:55:37 PM »
I believe landmarks and landscapes are more common on circulation coins these days than they used to be, say, 100 years ago.

That's a theme rather than a style. But yes, the end of the First World War marked a break in style. Emperors, heraldry, sprigs and wreaths - these became less common on coins.

Which are your favourites among landscape / landmark designs on coins? Do you notice any radically different numismatic styles applied to them?
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Styles of numismatic design
« Reply #34 on: July 16, 2020, 05:35:23 PM »
Interesting by the way that the "Je maintiendrai" motto from the Luxembourg coronation coin also appears in the Dutch CoA ...

An accident of history. It started out as the motto of the Chalon family, princes of Orange: Je maintiendrai Chalon. When William, count of Nassau inherited the princedom of Orange, a more important title, he took the motto Je maintiendrai Nassau. In time, the last word was dropped. The Orange family eventually became king of the Netherlands as well as grand duke of Luxembourg. When William III died, the male line of the House of Orange-Nassau became extinct. Due to different regimes of inheritance, the crown of the Netherlands went to his daughter, Wilhelmina of Orange-Nassau, but the crown of Luxembourg continued in the male line, devolving upon the head of the only surviving branch of the House of Nassau, ex-Duke Adolf of Nassau-Weilburg. Both carried on with the Nassau motto.

Peter
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Styles of numismatic design
« Reply #35 on: July 17, 2020, 10:21:08 AM »
Interesting story, Peter! And <k>, there are two series that come to mind, both introduced in the mid-1990s: Slovakia (OK, that was a new or "re-born" country, thus the need to have new coins anyway) but also Norway, with the 1, 5, 10 and 20 kr coins first issued at that time. See here, scroll down a little for the coins ...

Christian

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Re: Styles of numismatic design
« Reply #36 on: July 17, 2020, 12:45:34 PM »
Yes, I love the old Slovakian set. Another beautiful set DESTROYED by the advent of the euro.

The Norwegian set passed me by. I knew of it but found it too minimalist.

My own favourite is the Jersey set, but then you would expect me to adore Royal Mint 'overseas' style. I say 'overseas', because the Royal Mint does 'thematic' sets for overseas but only heraldic for the UK.



See also: Circulation sets depicting buildings.
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Styles of numismatic design
« Reply #37 on: July 17, 2020, 07:48:05 PM »
Yes, I love the old Slovakian set. Another beautiful set DESTROYED by the advent of the euro.

Yeah, those terrible euro dictators decided that every member of the currency union can have up to eight denomination specific designs but Slovakia will be forced to have only three ho-hum designs. >:D

Algeria's circulation coin set is interesting partly because of the animals. But they also have cool designs for the figures indicating the face values, such as this quarter ...

Christian

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Re: Styles of numismatic design
« Reply #38 on: July 18, 2020, 01:48:28 PM »












'Many objects' - is that style or a theme?
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Online <k>

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Re: Styles of numismatic design
« Reply #39 on: July 18, 2020, 01:49:36 PM »








Micro-lettering and laser marks give a coin a very modern look.
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