Author Topic: Coin systems with more than one subunit  (Read 270 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
« Reply #15 on: July 15, 2020, 10:17:57 AM »
Thought of that, but it is controversial. Disme (the spelling on the first types) may have the same root as the "decime" of the French revolution and be a denomination. However, it may also be a nickname, much like penny, nickel, quarter, 2 bits, and half are nicknames, even though they may refer to a British coin or Spanish peso/reales coins.

As a comfort, I offer that many US tax tokens are denominated in mils, so that in the end the US did have multiple sub-units.

Peter
« Last Edit: July 15, 2020, 11:46:38 AM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
« Reply #16 on: July 15, 2020, 10:25:10 AM »
From what I know, the dime or disme is indeed a subunit of the US dollar. Then again, nobody really counts or calculates with it – people do not say "that'll be four dollars, six dimes and four cents". :) Now "nickel" and "penny" are actually nicknames ...

Christian

Offline Henk

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Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
« Reply #17 on: July 15, 2020, 10:37:49 AM »
Whether used or not, the denomination DIME is prominantly stated on the coin.

Offline <k>

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Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
« Reply #18 on: July 15, 2020, 01:11:58 PM »
In the UK in the 1960s, there were coins named farthing, florin and half crown. They were not regarded as true subunit names but names of coins. Similarly, the dime is not a true subunit. If it were, then the quarter would be denominated as 2½ dimes and the half dollar as 5 dimes.
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
« Reply #19 on: July 15, 2020, 03:54:19 PM »
Initially the US currency had four, hmm, unit levels by law – the dollar was divided into ten di(s)mes, a dime was ten cents, and a cent was ten mills. The mil is gone, and I don't think anybody calculates with dimes (see my previous example). But keep in mind that a long time ago there were actually Half Dime coins ...

Christian
« Last Edit: July 15, 2020, 05:58:27 PM by chrisild »

Offline <k>

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Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
« Reply #20 on: July 15, 2020, 04:00:36 PM »
I sse. Thank you for the historical lesson. So the 'ONE DIME' is a piece of historical residue.
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Offline Henk

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Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
« Reply #21 on: July 23, 2020, 08:41:16 PM »
Belgium 2 Belgas (= 10 Francs) KM100 and 4 Belgas (= 20 Francs) KM101