Author Topic: Coin systems with more than one subunit  (Read 432 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 884
Coin systems with more than one subunit
« on: July 14, 2020, 05:17:23 PM »
I experienced such a system in the UK before 1971, when we had pounds, shillings and pence. We also had farthing, florins and crowns, but these were just names for coins of a particular denomination and were not official subunits.

In Malta before the euro, mils and cents were the subunits of the lira.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline quaziright

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 475
Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2020, 05:24:55 PM »
I believe Jordan and Egypt have/had a mix of piastres, fils and Qirsh

Offline chrisild

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8 761
  • NW · DE · EU
Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2020, 05:31:49 PM »
In Malta before the euro, mils and cents were the subunits of the lira.

Hmm, not quite. Malta had a "three-unit" setup until 1983; then the pound was replaced by a decimal lira (Lm 1 = 100 cents). And of course, if we go back in history, we could list many currency systems with two (maybe even more) sub-units. :)

Christian

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 884
Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
« Reply #3 on: July 14, 2020, 05:34:00 PM »
So my dates were out with Malta. In 1986 Malta introduced a new coin series without mils.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 884
Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
« Reply #4 on: July 14, 2020, 05:43:39 PM »
According to Wikipedia:

The Egyptian pound is divided into 100 piastres or ersh, or 1,000 milliemes.

But does Egypt now use any coin lower than 1 piastre?
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 884
Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2020, 05:45:44 PM »
According to Wikipedia:

The Jordanian dinar is divided into 10 dirhams, 100 qirsh (also called piastres) or 1000 fulus.

I think 'fils' is more usual than fulus - for Europeans, anyway. What is currently the lowest denomination of coin in circulation in Jordan?
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline stef

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 93
Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2020, 07:38:40 PM »
Vietnam, before 1978, had 1 đồng = 10 hào, 1 hào = 10 xu. From 1978 only đồng and hào. With the inflation the hao disappeared from circulation but I don't know when.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 884
Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2020, 07:41:21 PM »
Thank you, stef.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline stef

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 93
Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
« Reply #8 on: July 14, 2020, 08:04:05 PM »
The Libyan pound (1952-1971) also had qirsh (1/100) and millims (1/1000)

Offline stef

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 93
Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
« Reply #9 on: July 14, 2020, 08:07:50 PM »
Zaire - 1 zaïre = 100 makuta, 1 likuta = 100 sengi

Offline stef

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 93
Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
« Reply #10 on: July 14, 2020, 08:13:03 PM »
China - 1 圓 = 10 角, 1 角 = 10 分 (yuan, jiao, fen).

Offline andyg

  • Global Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3 738
  • DERBYS · UK
Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
« Reply #11 on: July 14, 2020, 08:16:07 PM »
According to Wikipedia:

The Egyptian pound is divided into 100 piastres or ersh, or 1,000 milliemes.

But does Egypt now use any coin lower than 1 piastre?

Smallest coin is 50 Piastres, very rare to find any coins in change - lots of almost worthless banknotes though!
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

Offline andyg

  • Global Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3 738
  • DERBYS · UK
Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
« Reply #12 on: July 14, 2020, 08:19:51 PM »
According to Wikipedia:

The Jordanian dinar is divided into 10 dirhams, 100 qirsh (also called piastres) or 1000 fulus.

I think 'fils' is more usual than fulus - for Europeans, anyway. What is currently the lowest denomination of coin in circulation in Jordan?

When I was there back in 2005, the smallest coin was a Piastre (there was a current ½ Piastre but that had fallen out of use even by then)
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 884
Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
« Reply #13 on: July 14, 2020, 08:26:29 PM »
Thank you, all. I see andyg seemed to have a taste for hot sandy countries.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline Henk

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 375
Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
« Reply #14 on: July 15, 2020, 09:28:34 AM »
The US has 1$ = 10 dimes and 1 dime = 10 cents